Electrical Current

Kingrex

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Feb 4, 2019
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Video on electron flow.

I find most topics related to power as interesting. I saw this thread when people posted about Synergistic Carbon Tuning Disc. What really caught my attention was
Energy travels in the electric and magnetic radiated field, not the wire.
Shielding.


Energy flows in a right hand flux perpendicular to the electric and magnetic field.

Traveling electro magnetic fields around the wire carry the power.

So what does this mean to me. These are my assumptions:
It means I question a wire in a metal pipe or shielded. If you shield a wire, you’re altering the way the radiated fields interact with each other.

It also means, any device near or around a wire, interacting with the fields around the wire, are altering the energy flow in the wire. Whether this is a positive or negative affect is up to debate.

This is probably a reason any break in a wire, may it be a wire nut, circuit breaker, screw to receptacle becomes a point where an EMI sniffer reads “noise”. The electro magnetic field is jumping from one plane to another plane. Now imagine what a wire nut does to energy flow. Not only is the energy jumping planes, it is forced to make a 180* turn. That is why I do not use wire nuts in audio circuits.
Rex
 

Alrainbow

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Dec 12, 2013
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Very true most all clueless lol except for the Google crowd still clueless but great at posts. In the end how it sounds can alter how it’s measured
the design of the equipment and how all devices are used with there own synergy is the end result
but I truly am on ur thought process
 

kapiti

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Mar 22, 2022
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I see it a little differently. Electrical energy does run in wires, AND in the field around the wires. Since an electrical current can run in a wire in a vacuum, then it is getting no help from a field, since the vacuum cannot be energised. If energy only flowed in the field, then the signal in the wires in the vacuum would not achieve anything - but it does. Both the signal in the wires and in the field are relevant, and the relationship between them is two-way.

Because an audio signal running in wires creates a field around it, and that field reflects the signal, then equally, disturbing the field disturbs the signal in the wires. Therefore what surrounds the wires affects the sound quality as much as the performance of the wires. Typically, we are running wires in dielectrics like PTFE, etc, and to the extent that the dielectric cannot change the field inside itself as fast as the signal can change in the wire, then this time-smearing of the field in the dielectric feeds back to time-smear the signal in the wires. This is what causes different dielectric materials to impart different sonic signatures on the sound of a cable.

Both the wires and the field are important. As a cable designer, the thing you crave more than a super-conductor, is a super-dielectric - one that is strong enough to control the conductor gap along the cable, and that can store and release energy as fast as is required by digital and analog audio signals. Designs that try to create an air dielectric, or partial air dielectric (such as foam, woven cotton or woven silk) typically suffer from not being able to maintain the conductor gap to a tight tolerance.
 

Alrainbow

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Dec 12, 2013
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I see it a little differently. Electrical energy does run in wires, AND in the field around the wires. Since an electrical current can run in a wire in a vacuum, then it is getting no help from a field, since the vacuum cannot be energised. If energy only flowed in the field, then the signal in the wires in the vacuum would not achieve anything - but it does. Both the signal in the wires and in the field are relevant, and the relationship between them is two-way.

Because an audio signal running in wires creates a field around it, and that field reflects the signal, then equally, disturbing the field disturbs the signal in the wires. Therefore what surrounds the wires affects the sound quality as much as the performance of the wires. Typically, we are running wires in dielectrics like PTFE, etc, and to the extent that the dielectric cannot change the field inside itself as fast as the signal can change in the wire, then this time-smearing of the field in the dielectric feeds back to time-smear the signal in the wires. This is what causes different dielectric materials to impart different sonic signatures on the sound of a cable.

Both the wires and the field are important. As a cable designer, the thing you crave more than a super-conductor, is a super-dielectric - one that is strong enough to control the conductor gap along the cable, and that can store and release energy as fast as is required by digital and analog audio signals. Designs that try to create an air dielectric, or partial air dielectric (such as foam, woven cotton or woven silk) typically suffer from not being able to maintain the conductor gap to a tight tolerance.
Man there is many things you get wrong. For one current does not run anywhere
Voltage is potential and simple terms pressure like water in a garden hose .
Electrons in a vacuum are very much effected
Just place a magnet near a tube playing music at a low volume to be careful
What really goes on is very complex and all effects all
 

kapiti

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Mar 22, 2022
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So even when I try to keep it simple by talking about signal and energy, you manage to hear voltage and current? Are we going to play 'your EE degree is bigger than mine' here? It seems that is probably because I put a different view forward? Rather than respond to the idea, you wish to attack and call it wrong. Not sure why I joined this place now.
 

Kingrex

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Feb 4, 2019
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I know Al. I did not get his comment about electrons in a vacuum. I have never heard that. A light bulb is a vacuum.

As far as I know, electrons don't need nitrogen and oxygen surrounding them to work. I would think electrons in a conductor would work better in a vacuum without the interference of the electrons in the gasses that surround the wire acting upon them.
 

Kingrex

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Feb 4, 2019
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There is an updated follow on second video
.The 1/c was a simplification assuming a distance of 1m ie t=distance/velocity = 1m/(c= m/t units)

The topic of the video is the Poynting vector
That is a great follow up video. And right there near the end, internal ground loops inside your equipment was touched on.

It also validates why I twist my wire. I want to keep the inductance and capacitance the same throughout the circuit. I don't want it fluctuating in intensity.

There is also another very interesting nugget touched on. That 3rd wire doing nothing. It is it.
 

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