Ode to a Swiss Turntable

marty

Well-Known Member
Apr 20, 2010
1,616
682
275
United States
#1
I feel worse about this than I have after attending some funerals. After 30 plus years, I am retiring my much beloved Goldmund Studio turntable with a Goldmund T3F tonearm. If I had a dollar for every time this turntable made my brain sing, I would be a wealthy man. I can however, attest to the fact that I found great comfort in benefiting from riches in lieu of dollars for all the joy that table provided over several decades of use.


IMG_2405.jpeg


I, along with almost every audiophile at the time, coveted the Goldmund Reference that for lack of a better descriptor, Harry Pearson put on the map in the late 80’s. At the time, I certainly could not afford a Goldmund Reference, but broke the piggy bank to buy a Goldmund Studio and one of the latest versions of the famed T3F arm which was a demo piece from a well-known dealer in Philly. The Studio and T3 arm (originally a T3B) was actually first made in 1981, well before Goldmund introduced their Reference Table in 1986. Although the Studio was not the Reference, its sound quality was, and still is, superb by any standard. Its sheer musicality is outstanding and never gets in the way of listening. Its midrange is about as good as it gets, and when set-up properly, has unbelievable dynamics, transparency, slam, and excellent bass. The key is that “set-up” is a bitch and then some. There are more tricks to setting this thing up than Carter’s has liver pills, and applying the full measure of these tricks took the better part of those 30 years to navigate. The good news, is that I think I’ve finally mastered it!! (As one of my patients once told me, his daddy’s favorite expression about him was “he may not be smart, but he sure is slow”. I can relate.) We all know everything matters in audio, but the Studio/T3F pushed me to my limits. The miniscule requisite forward angle of the tonearm carriage; the tracking force which cannot be adjusted with a fine tuning knob but rather with big clunky weights; the cartridge azimuth which must be adjusted with head shell shims as there is no azimuth adjustment on the arm; the VTA which requires miniscule adjustments of surgical precision to get right; the optimal rotation and position of the springs under the platter; and last but not least, the damn silicon damping fluid trough (which requires optimum levels with +/- 10uL using a lab pipette) comprise many of the mind-numbing hurdles one has to clear to get this thing to perform it’s best. But when it does, it’s a delight indeed. I’ve used several cartridges but for most of its life, Benz cartridges have served me well, going way back to a Benz MC-3 that Dave Wilson was quite fond of, then to a Ruby, and Ruby 2 and culminating in a Benz LPS currently. For all the cursing I did in setting the table up in all its iterations over 30+ years, it is the joy of making music with it that I will always remember fondly. I really love this thing and will truly be sad to see it go.

I’ve paired the TT with a long list of preamps and phono stages covering the usual suspects (ARC, VTL, Krell, etc.), but my current Zanden 1200 MkIII is the current cat’s meow and is more than ready to welcome its new replacement which is this:

IMG_2401.jpeg

https://dohmannaudio.com/helix-one/

The acquisition of the Dohmann Helix 1 Mk II has more twists and plot turns than an Agatha Christie novel. It was actually the 3rd table I made an offer for, having failed at buying a Kodo Beat SE and a Wave Kinetics NVS after making offers that I thought were accepted only to be withdrawn in the 11th hour. I initially hesitated on making an offer for the Dohmann because I presumed it was unobtainable at the asking price, but desperation is a funny thing. I had nothing to lose except my pride so I made an offer that was fortunately, ultimately accepted.

More on this potentially outstanding table when it completes its first round of set-up and listening. Although my Goldmund has been the one piece of audio gear I owned for the longest time, every cloud does indeed have a silver lining and the Dohmann looks like it could genuinely be a very nice ray of sunshine as it undertakes its new role as the last TT I will likely ever own. We shall soon see.
 
Last edited:

Ron Resnick

Site Co-Owner, Administrator
Jan 25, 2015
7,569
1,859
440
Beverly Hills, CA
#2
That was a wonderful eulogy for the Goldmund Studio turntable with Goldmund T3F tonearm!

Congratulations on the purchase of the Dohmann Helix 1 Mk II!
 

bonzo75

Member Sponsor
Feb 26, 2014
13,400
2,832
460
London
#3
Congrats. What arm are you using on the Doehmann
 

cjfrbw

Well-Known Member
Apr 20, 2010
2,600
350
260
Pleasanton, CA
#4
I'm using a Benz MC-3 cartridge now. I had one several years ago that broke (channel went out).

Benz re-manufactured a single MC-3 to tour with shows (presumably for the older philes who remembered it). It had the last serial number, was display only.

Tour ended, some guy got a hold of it and sold it on Audiogon for $700. I bought it, and kept it in a drawer for a few years before my other cartridges entered "stylus replacement" stage. I have it now and have had it on my turntable for a while. Along with the Sony xl 55, it's one of those high performing classics.

Congrats on new table. First time I have heard of it.
 

marty

Well-Known Member
Apr 20, 2010
1,616
682
275
United States
#5
Congrats. What arm are you using on the Doehmann
Always wanted to try a Reed 3P so that's what is currently ordered- delivery in a few weeks. I think the ease of reliable and reproducible adjustments (azimuth, VTA, etc) may be important and useful, hence the Reed. Adjustments on the Goldmund is an ordeal just short of a religious ritual so I sought an easier but acceptable alternative. Would have preferred the 5T as I'm fond of linear trackers, but the cost was prohibitive. I've had a ZYX Uni II premium sitting on the shelf unused for well over a year, so that will go on the Reed.
 
Last edited:

Ron Resnick

Site Co-Owner, Administrator
Jan 25, 2015
7,569
1,859
440
Beverly Hills, CA
#6
That is all great, Marty!

I will be very curious for your report on the Reed 3P. The Grado Epoch on the Reed 5T in audioquattr's system was a transcendent experience for me, but neither he nor I could countenance the 5T's ambient sunlight behavior. And the 5T may be completely reliable, but it looks scary complicated.
 

MPS

Active Member
Jun 20, 2016
62
22
25
Finland
#7
Wow, really seems like the ultimate turntable, congratulations!
(btw, always loved the Goldmund sound, amazing piece that one)
 

Ron Resnick

Site Co-Owner, Administrator
Jan 25, 2015
7,569
1,859
440
Beverly Hills, CA
#9
I don't think it's ugly, actually.
 

BruceD

VIP/Donor
Dec 13, 2013
1,105
121
135
#10
Always wanted to try a Reed 3P so that's what is currently ordered- delivery in a few weeks. I think the ease of reliable and reproducible adjustments (azimuth, VTA, etc) may be important and useful, hence the Reed. Adjustments on the Goldmund is an ordeal just short of a religious ritual so I sought an easier but acceptable alternative. Would have preferred the 5T as I'm fond of linear trackers, but the cost was prohibitive. I've had a ZYX Uni II premium sitting on the shelf unused for well over a year, so that will go on the Reed.
Congrats on the Döhmann TT the intuition behind that TT is no joke--interesting on the Reed choice , Helix usually show with the Schroeder or SAT
but I'm sure the REED will complement your setup admirably --Good Listening:)!

BruceD
 

Vienna

VIP/Donor
Oct 14, 2018
317
189
125
44
Athens Greece
#13
I feel worse about this than I have after attending some funerals. After 30 plus years, I am retiring my much beloved Goldmund Studio turntable with a Goldmund T3F tonearm. If I had a dollar for every time this turntable made my brain sing, I would be a wealthy man. I can however, attest to the fact that I found great comfort in benefiting from riches in lieu of dollars for all the joy that table provided over several decades of use.


View attachment 61605


I, along with almost every audiophile at the time, coveted the Goldmund Reference that for lack of a better descriptor, Harry Pearson put on the map in the late 80’s. At the time, I certainly could not afford a Goldmund Reference, but broke the piggy bank to buy a Goldmund Studio and one of the latest versions of the famed T3F arm which was a demo piece from a well-known dealer in Philly. The Studio and T3 arm (originally a T3B) was actually first made in 1981, well before Goldmund introduced their Reference Table in 1986. Although the Studio was not the Reference, its sound quality was, and still is, superb by any standard. Its sheer musicality is outstanding and never gets in the way of listening. Its midrange is about as good as it gets, and when set-up properly, has unbelievable dynamics, transparency, slam, and excellent bass. The key is that “set-up” is a bitch and then some. There are more tricks to setting this thing up than Carter’s has liver pills, and applying the full measure of these tricks took the better part of those 30 years to navigate. The good news, is that I think I’ve finally mastered it!! (As one of my patients once told me, his daddy’s favorite expression about him was “he may not be smart, but he sure is slow”. I can relate.) We all know everything matters in audio, but the Studio/T3F pushed me to my limits. The miniscule requisite forward angle of the tonearm carriage; the tracking force which cannot be adjusted with a fine tuning knob but rather with big clunky weights; the cartridge azimuth which must be adjusted with head shell shims as there is no azimuth adjustment on the arm; the VTA which requires miniscule adjustments of surgical precision to get right; the optimal rotation and position of the springs under the platter; and last but not least, the damn silicon damping fluid trough (which requires optimum levels with +/- 10uL using a lab pipette) comprise many of the mind-numbing hurdles one has to clear to get this thing to perform it’s best. But when it does, it’s a delight indeed. I’ve used several cartridges but for most of its life, Benz cartridges have served me well, going way back to a Benz MC-3 that Dave Wilson was quite fond of, then to a Ruby, and Ruby 2 and culminating in a Benz LPS currently. For all the cursing I did in setting the table up in all its iterations over 30+ years, it is the joy of making music with it that I will always remember fondly. I really love this thing and will truly be sad to see it go.

I’ve paired the TT with a long list of preamps and phono stages covering the usual suspects (ARC, VTL, Krell, etc.), but my current Zanden 1200 MkIII is the current cat’s meow and is more than ready to welcome its new replacement which is this:

View attachment 61608

https://dohmannaudio.com/helix-one/

The acquisition of the Dohmann Helix 1 Mk II has more twists and plot turns than an Agatha Christie novel. It was actually the 3rd table I made an offer for, having failed at buying a Kodo Beat SE and a Wave Kinetics NVS after making offers that I thought were accepted only to be withdrawn in the 11th hour. I initially hesitated on making an offer for the Dohmann because I presumed it was unobtainable at the asking price, but desperation is a funny thing. I had nothing to lose except my pride so I made an offer that was fortunately, ultimately accepted.

More on this potentially outstanding table when it completes its first round of set-up and listening. Although my Goldmund has been the one piece of audio gear I owned for the longest time, every cloud does indeed have a silver lining and the Dohmann looks like it could genuinely be a very nice ray of sunshine as it undertakes its new role as the last TT I will likely ever own. We shall soon see.
Really nice post.
 

morricab

Well-Known Member
Apr 25, 2014
3,991
799
198
Switzerland
#14
Always wanted to try a Reed 3P so that's what is currently ordered- delivery in a few weeks. I think the ease of reliable and reproducible adjustments (azimuth, VTA, etc) may be important and useful, hence the Reed. Adjustments on the Goldmund is an ordeal just short of a religious ritual so I sought an easier but acceptable alternative. Would have preferred the 5T as I'm fond of linear trackers, but the cost was prohibitive. I've had a ZYX Uni II premium sitting on the shelf unused for well over a year, so that will go on the Reed.
Apparently, the Goldmund TT works even better with a good gimbal arm (like a tri-planar). The Reed arm should work well on the Doheman.
 

bonzo75

Member Sponsor
Feb 26, 2014
13,400
2,832
460
London
#15
There are three Doehmann reports on my blog, on both 1 and 2, mainly with Schroeder CB arms and various carts and phonos. The Schroeder CB is what they are tied up to produce and match along with the Thrax
 

metaphacts

Industry Expert
Feb 1, 2011
226
65
110
Lower Provo River
#16
I feel worse about this than I have after attending some funerals. After 30 plus years, I am retiring my much beloved Goldmund Studio turntable with a Goldmund T3F tonearm. If I had a dollar for every time this turntable made my brain sing, I would be a wealthy man. I can however, attest to the fact that I found great comfort in benefiting from riches in lieu of dollars for all the joy that table provided over several decades of use.


View attachment 61605


I, along with almost every audiophile at the time, coveted the Goldmund Reference that for lack of a better descriptor, Harry Pearson put on the map in the late 80’s. At the time, I certainly could not afford a Goldmund Reference, but broke the piggy bank to buy a Goldmund Studio and one of the latest versions of the famed T3F arm which was a demo piece from a well-known dealer in Philly. The Studio and T3 arm (originally a T3B) was actually first made in 1981, well before Goldmund introduced their Reference Table in 1986. Although the Studio was not the Reference, its sound quality was, and still is, superb by any standard. Its sheer musicality is outstanding and never gets in the way of listening. Its midrange is about as good as it gets, and when set-up properly, has unbelievable dynamics, transparency, slam, and excellent bass. The key is that “set-up” is a bitch and then some. There are more tricks to setting this thing up than Carter’s has liver pills, and applying the full measure of these tricks took the better part of those 30 years to navigate. The good news, is that I think I’ve finally mastered it!! (As one of my patients once told me, his daddy’s favorite expression about him was “he may not be smart, but he sure is slow”. I can relate.) We all know everything matters in audio, but the Studio/T3F pushed me to my limits. The miniscule requisite forward angle of the tonearm carriage; the tracking force which cannot be adjusted with a fine tuning knob but rather with big clunky weights; the cartridge azimuth which must be adjusted with head shell shims as there is no azimuth adjustment on the arm; the VTA which requires miniscule adjustments of surgical precision to get right; the optimal rotation and position of the springs under the platter; and last but not least, the damn silicon damping fluid trough (which requires optimum levels with +/- 10uL using a lab pipette) comprise many of the mind-numbing hurdles one has to clear to get this thing to perform it’s best. But when it does, it’s a delight indeed. I’ve used several cartridges but for most of its life, Benz cartridges have served me well, going way back to a Benz MC-3 that Dave Wilson was quite fond of, then to a Ruby, and Ruby 2 and culminating in a Benz LPS currently. For all the cursing I did in setting the table up in all its iterations over 30+ years, it is the joy of making music with it that I will always remember fondly. I really love this thing and will truly be sad to see it go.

I’ve paired the TT with a long list of preamps and phono stages covering the usual suspects (ARC, VTL, Krell, etc.), but my current Zanden 1200 MkIII is the current cat’s meow and is more than ready to welcome its new replacement which is this:
It seems you have indeed hit on many of the keys to making a T3F do that of which it is capable. Given the serial number of the arm, I suspect that one passed through my hands, if not through my office on its way to you. Very glad to hear that it served you so well for so many years.
 

marty

Well-Known Member
Apr 20, 2010
1,616
682
275
United States
#17
It seems you have indeed hit on many of the keys to making a T3F do that of which it is capable. Given the serial number of the arm, I suspect that one passed through my hands, if not through my office on its way to you. Very glad to hear that it served you so well for so many years.
Bill
As you know, audiophiles often flip gear faster than some folks flip burgers. My approach has always been to upgrade the weakest link in my system as my budget allows. I can't think of very many pieces of gear that are capable of enduring that strategy for over 3 decades without making me feel compelled to change it out for a significantly improved alternative. So yes, it has indeed served me well. My biggest problem now is what to do with it when I retire it shortly. I don't have the space to keep it active; I don't want to put it in a closet, and I don't want to sell it because it would simply be too painful to do so. Tough one......
Marty
 

metaphacts

Industry Expert
Feb 1, 2011
226
65
110
Lower Provo River
#18
Bill
As you know, audiophiles often flip gear faster than some folks flip burgers. My approach has always been to upgrade the weakest link in my system as my budget allows. I can't think of very many pieces of gear that are capable of enduring that strategy for over 3 decades without making me feel compelled to change it out for a significantly improved alternative. So yes, it has indeed served me well. My biggest problem now is what to do with it when I retire it shortly. I don't have the space to keep it active; I don't want to put it in a closet, and I don't want to sell it because it would simply be too painful to do so. Tough one......
Marty
Marty, in 1986 Michel Reverchon hired me to open Goldmund's new US office. From then through 1993, everything Goldmund came through the US office in Chantilly, VA. Hence my comment. Further, since Pierre Duval, our Technical Service Director had designed the controller for the T3F, we considered it our duty to add an extra layer of QC once production units reached the US. As I said, I likely laid hands on yours before it shipped.

Few people ever realized the T3F's capabilities. I'm happy to see that you found so many of her secrets!
 

awsmone

Well-Known Member
Apr 7, 2014
1,292
174
135
Canberra Australia
#19
Gr
I feel worse about this than I have after attending some funerals. After 30 plus years, I am retiring my much beloved Goldmund Studio turntable with a Goldmund T3F tonearm. If I had a dollar for every time this turntable made my brain sing, I would be a wealthy man. I can however, attest to the fact that I found great comfort in benefiting from riches in lieu of dollars for all the joy that table provided over several decades of use.


View attachment 61605


I, along with almost every audiophile at the time, coveted the Goldmund Reference that for lack of a better descriptor, Harry Pearson put on the map in the late 80’s. At the time, I certainly could not afford a Goldmund Reference, but broke the piggy bank to buy a Goldmund Studio and one of the latest versions of the famed T3F arm which was a demo piece from a well-known dealer in Philly. The Studio and T3 arm (originally a T3B) was actually first made in 1981, well before Goldmund introduced their Reference Table in 1986. Although the Studio was not the Reference, its sound quality was, and still is, superb by any standard. Its sheer musicality is outstanding and never gets in the way of listening. Its midrange is about as good as it gets, and when set-up properly, has unbelievable dynamics, transparency, slam, and excellent bass. The key is that “set-up” is a bitch and then some. There are more tricks to setting this thing up than Carter’s has liver pills, and applying the full measure of these tricks took the better part of those 30 years to navigate. The good news, is that I think I’ve finally mastered it!! (As one of my patients once told me, his daddy’s favorite expression about him was “he may not be smart, but he sure is slow”. I can relate.) We all know everything matters in audio, but the Studio/T3F pushed me to my limits. The miniscule requisite forward angle of the tonearm carriage; the tracking force which cannot be adjusted with a fine tuning knob but rather with big clunky weights; the cartridge azimuth which must be adjusted with head shell shims as there is no azimuth adjustment on the arm; the VTA which requires miniscule adjustments of surgical precision to get right; the optimal rotation and position of the springs under the platter; and last but not least, the damn silicon damping fluid trough (which requires optimum levels with +/- 10uL using a lab pipette) comprise many of the mind-numbing hurdles one has to clear to get this thing to perform it’s best. But when it does, it’s a delight indeed. I’ve used several cartridges but for most of its life, Benz cartridges have served me well, going way back to a Benz MC-3 that Dave Wilson was quite fond of, then to a Ruby, and Ruby 2 and culminating in a Benz LPS currently. For all the cursing I did in setting the table up in all its iterations over 30+ years, it is the joy of making music with it that I will always remember fondly. I really love this thing and will truly be sad to see it go.

I’ve paired the TT with a long list of preamps and phono stages covering the usual suspects (ARC, VTL, Krell, etc.), but my current Zanden 1200 MkIII is the current cat’s meow and is more than ready to welcome its new replacement which is this:

View attachment 61608

https://dohmannaudio.com/helix-one/

The acquisition of the Dohmann Helix 1 Mk II has more twists and plot turns than an Agatha Christie novel. It was actually the 3rd table I made an offer for, having failed at buying a Kodo Beat SE and a Wave Kinetics NVS after making offers that I thought were accepted only to be withdrawn in the 11th hour. I initially hesitated on making an offer for the Dohmann because I presumed it was unobtainable at the asking price, but desperation is a funny thing. I had nothing to lose except my pride so I made an offer that was fortunately, ultimately accepted.

More on this potentially outstanding table when it completes its first round of set-up and listening. Although my Goldmund has been the one piece of audio gear I owned for the longest time, every cloud does indeed have a silver lining and the Dohmann looks like it could genuinely be a very nice ray of sunshine as it undertakes its new role as the last TT I will likely ever own. We shall soon see.
great post Marty

lets know how u get on with the helix as I am interested in that table myself
 

About us

  • What’s Best Forum is THE forum for high-end audio, product reviews, advice and sharing experiences on the best of everything else. A place where audiophiles and audio companies discuss existing and new audio products, music servers, music streamers and computer audio, digital to audio converters, turntables, phono stages, cartridges, reel to reel, speakers, headphones, tube amplifiers and solid state amplification. Founded in 2010 What's Best Forum invites intelligent and courteous people of all interests and backgrounds to describe and discuss the best of everything. From beginners to life-long hobbyists to industry professionals we enjoy learning about new things and meeting new people and participating in spirited debates.

Quick Navigation

User Menu

Steve Williams
Site Founder | Site Owner | Administrator
Ron Resnick
Site Co-Owner | Administrator
Julian (The Fixer)
Website Build | Marketing Managersing