New idea for Bass mode treatment

Kal Rubinson

Well-Known Member
May 5, 2010
1,740
172
225
NYC/CT
www.stereophile.com
#21
I assume the summed response could be predicted given enough frequency and phase response measurements taken over a sufficiently large area for each bass source, but I could be wrong.
Perhaps, depending on the number and distribution of the measurements but not as efficiently as directly correlated data, especially as the number of sources increases.
 
Likes: Duke LeJeune
#22
Please correct me if I am wrong, but my understanding is that bass modes occur when 2 parallel walls reflect bass energy to/from to create nulls and peaks for a specific frequency depending upon the distance between the walls. Historically, absorbers have been the most common method to tackle the bass anomalies. BUT, what if we took a different approach, much like what is done in auditoriums and symphony halls. Instead of absorbtion, we change the underlying cause (parallel walls). And, instead of just skewing one wall, we create a very diverse surface that scatters the bass sound waves much like a diffusor.

So, I stumble across a product call Woodskin. It comes in several sizes that can be turned / twisted to create the diverse surface that would deflect bass sound waves in multiple direcdtions that would minimize room bass modes. I was thinking of placing a large woodskin surface on the front wall including 2 corners. See the attached photos that give you an idea of how flexible this product can be used.

Imagine that the front wall has Woodskin covering floor to ceiling in one corner. At the floor level, the woodskin in the corner would be close to the front wall surface. Then, as the woodskin traverses to the ceiling, the woodskin would undulate away from the front wall. The woodskin would also move toward the other corner, so we get about 50% coverage on the front wall.

Thinking out loud, there might be unfavorable scattering that would be hard to control. But, would this still be better than room modes.

Please let us know your thoughts. this stuff isn't cheap. It runs $75 - $125 / SF. I would put rock wool in the space between the woodskin and the front wall.
Please correct me if I am wrong, but my understanding is that bass modes occur when 2 parallel walls reflect bass energy to/from to create nulls and peaks for a specific frequency depending upon the distance between the walls. Historically, absorbers have been the most common method to tackle the bass anomalies. BUT, what if we took a different approach, much like what is done in auditoriums and symphony halls. Instead of absorbtion, we change the underlying cause (parallel walls). And, instead of just skewing one wall, we create a very diverse surface that scatters the bass sound waves much like a diffusor.

So, I stumble across a product call Woodskin. It comes in several sizes that can be turned / twisted to create the diverse surface that would deflect bass sound waves in multiple direcdtions that would minimize room bass modes. I was thinking of placing a large woodskin surface on the front wall including 2 corners. See the attached photos that give you an idea of how flexible this product can be used.

Imagine that the front wall has Woodskin covering floor to ceiling in one corner. At the floor level, the woodskin in the corner would be close to the front wall surface. Then, as the woodskin traverses to the ceiling, the woodskin would undulate away from the front wall. The woodskin would also move toward the other corner, so we get about 50% coverage on the front wall.

Thinking out loud, there might be unfavorable scattering that would be hard to control. But, would this still be better than room modes.

Please let us know your thoughts. this stuff isn't cheap. It runs $75 - $125 / SF. I would put rock wool in the space between the woodskin and the front wall.
Do not confuse middle and high-frequency reflections with low-frequency pressure waves. Waves and ray energy are completely different in form and treatment requirements. Low-frequency energy is pressure based while middle and high-frequency energy is based upon air movement across a surface area.
 

kach22i

WBF Founding Member
Apr 21, 2010
1,303
108
225
Ann Arbor, Michigan
www.kachadoorian.com
#23
Do not confuse middle and high-frequency reflections with low-frequency pressure waves. Waves and ray energy are completely different in form and treatment requirements. Low-frequency energy is pressure based while middle and high-frequency energy is based upon air movement across a surface area.
That is an interesting and informative addition to the thread.

There has been some chatter in various audio forums lately that the phrase "pressurizing a room" should be replaced with "energizing a room" instead.

The contention here I believe is that bass doesn't really pressurize, it energizes as in modes/nodes found throughout various parts of the room.

Is there any merit to this attempt at rephrasing what happens in a room in regards to bass energy and it's distribution?
 

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