Recent Concerts You've Enjoyed

marty

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Apr 20, 2010
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Saw Billy Joel last night again at MSG in NYC. His 66th show there! It's such a joy to see so many happy and rockin' folks in one place. But it was almost spoiled when Billy announced that his friends Bill and Hillary Clinton were in the audience. The cameras immediately put them on the big screen to a howl of cheers and sadly, a lot of boos. I say sadly because it just seemed a rude gesture. I admit I'm not a fan of their politics, but really, can't we be nice enough to show enough respect just to leave them alone and let them enjoy their evening. If you don't want to clap politely, then just shut the hell up. We have become so damn polarized and numb we can;t even accord a former President a modicum of respect at a concert, for goodness sake. That said, Billy was his usual great self.
 
May 25, 2010
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In our recent London sojourn, we focused on concerts during our first 10 days, since we were being joined by our grandkids (first London visit for them) and their parents after that. We did eight concerts in 10 days.

Started on June 1 going to Oxford with Ed Pong and his wife (Ed of Ultra Analogue Tapes) to hear one of Ed's artists, Alena Baeva (winner of the Wieniawski Competition in 2001 at the tender age of 16). Alena played the rarely heard and quite difficult Schumann Violin Concerto with the Oxford Philharmonic (who also played the Bartok Concerto for Orchestra).

June 2 (also with the Pongs) we heard the London Symphony with the great Danill Trifonov playing the Beethoven Emperor Concerto with our local conductor from San Francisco Michael Tilson Thomas conducting (as he often does with the LSO this time of year). They played at the Barbican in London.

June 3 was a chamber music concert (final concert with the Pongs who returned to Canada after this concert) at the wonderful Wigmore Hall. We heard the Doric Quartet with pianist Jonathan Biss playing one of my favorites, the Brahms piano quintet, along with a Dvorak piano quartet.

June 5 was a special treat. We were invited to a private concert at the French School near South Kensington Station, with the young violinist Bomsori Kim, who recently was signed to a Deutsche Gramophone contract and released her first album earlier this year. We met with Bomsori after the concert and she gifted me with a copy of her album. She played the great Franck Sonata along with other pieces.

June 6 was back to the Barbican where we heard the LSO once more, this time with guest conductor Elim Chan. We had met Elim three years ago when she guest conducted the Berkeley Symphony. This time it was excerpts from Scheherazade along with some special guest musicians.

June 7 was the Royal Ballet, for a matinee concert at the Royal Opera House Covent Garden. There were three shorter ballets, including the Stravinsky Firebird with the original choreography of Folkine from the Ballets Russe of 1910.

June 8 was a trip out to Glyndebourne, a beautiful estate south of London, where the owner of the estate has constructed an opera house on the property. We have attended operas over the years there and people are encouraged to dress up. So like most of the males, I wore my tux and the ladies were also wearing fancy dress. The operas there are first rate and they have a long interval (intermission) of 90 minutes where dinner is served in restaurants on the property or people eat on the lawn bringing or buying fancy picnic baskets. We heard Massenet's Cendrillon (Cinderella) with the lady of the manor, the great Australian/American soprano Danielle DeNiese , singing the title role. This is the first time we had heard DeNiese who can both sing and act (and dance) wonderfully.

June 9, our final concert of this run was at the Royal Festival Hall with Esa-Pekka Salonen conducting the Philharmonia Orchestra in a program featuring composers from the Vienna of the beginning of the 20th century (Berg, Schoenberg and Kurt Weill). Salonen will be joining our local orchestra, the San Francisco Symphony next year, succeeding Tilson-Thomas who is retiring after 25 years as Music Director.

We snuck in a couple of additional concerts, but that is enough for now.

Larry
 

bonzo75

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Feb 26, 2014
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In our recent London sojourn, we focused on concerts during our first 10 days, since we were being joined by our grandkids (first London visit for them) and their parents after that. We did eight concerts in 10 days.

Started on June 1 going to Oxford with Ed Pong and his wife (Ed of Ultra Analogue Tapes) to hear one of Ed's artists, Alena Baeva (winner of the Wieniawski Competition in 2001 at the tender age of 16). Alena played the rarely heard and quite difficult Schumann Violin Concerto with the Oxford Philharmonic (who also played the Bartok Concerto for Orchestra).

June 2 (also with the Pongs) we heard the London Symphony with the great Danill Trifonov playing the Beethoven Emperor Concerto with our local conductor from San Francisco Michael Tilson Thomas conducting (as he often does with the LSO this time of year). They played at the Barbican in London.

June 3 was a chamber music concert (final concert with the Pongs who returned to Canada after this concert) at the wonderful Wigmore Hall. We heard the Doric Quartet with pianist Jonathan Biss playing one of my favorites, the Brahms piano quintet, along with a Dvorak piano quartet.

June 5 was a special treat. We were invited to a private concert at the French School near South Kensington Station, with the young violinist Bomsori Kim, who recently was signed to a Deutsche Gramophone contract and released her first album earlier this year. We met with Bomsori after the concert and she gifted me with a copy of her album. She played the great Franck Sonata along with other pieces.

June 6 was back to the Barbican where we heard the LSO once more, this time with guest conductor Elim Chan. We had met Elim three years ago when she guest conducted the Berkeley Symphony. This time it was excerpts from Scheherazade along with some special guest musicians.

June 7 was the Royal Ballet, for a matinee concert at the Royal Opera House Covent Garden. There were three shorter ballets, including the Stravinsky Firebird with the original choreography of Folkine from the Ballets Russe of 1910.

June 8 was a trip out to Glyndebourne, a beautiful estate south of London, where the owner of the estate has constructed an opera house on the property. We have attended operas over the years there and people are encouraged to dress up. So like most of the males, I wore my tux and the ladies were also wearing fancy dress. The operas there are first rate and they have a long interval (intermission) of 90 minutes where dinner is served in restaurants on the property or people eat on the lawn bringing or buying fancy picnic baskets. We heard Massenet's Cendrillon (Cinderella) with the lady of the manor, the great Australian/American soprano Danielle DeNiese , singing the title role. This is the first time we had heard DeNiese who can both sing and act (and dance) wonderfully.

June 9, our final concert of this run was at the Royal Festival Hall with Esa-Pekka Salonen conducting the Philharmonia Orchestra in a program featuring composers from the Vienna of the beginning of the 20th century (Berg, Schoenberg and Kurt Weill). Salonen will be joining our local orchestra, the San Francisco Symphony next year, succeeding Tilson-Thomas who is retiring after 25 years as Music Director.

We snuck in a couple of additional concerts, but that is enough for now.

Larry
I was there at the same Daniil Trifonov. The previous day saw Julia Fischer there. I saw Elim Chan do Scheherazade the following Monday (three days after you watched it) but it was not good at all. The next week or so saw both Isabelle Faust and Viktoria Mullova do a double bill at Wigmore.
 
May 25, 2010
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I was there at the same Daniil Trifonov. The previous day saw Julia Fischer there. I saw Elim Chan do Scheherazade the following Monday (three days after you watched it) but it was not good at all. The next week or so saw both Isabelle Faust and Viktoria Mullova do a double bill at Wigmore.
London has the richest offerings of classical music anywhere in the world. The day we heard Trifonov, Nicola Benedetti was playing across town at Royal Festival Hall at exactly the same time. Would have loved to see and hear her also.

We had one more extraordinary treat. We were invited to a very private demonstration and concert (about 8 guests) at the famed violin shop J and A Beare, near Wigmore Hall. The young British violinist Jennifer Pike gave us a demo of four great violins, three Strads and one Guanari del Gesu. She then played a recital with two of the violins.

One of the other Strads is owned by the great violinist Ida Haendel (who is now in her 90's and no longer can play it). We heard her play that instrument a decade ago when she played the Brahms Violin Concerto with the Academy of St. Martin's in the Field with Neville Marriner conducting.

The four violins are worth about $50M (US) with the two she used in her recital worth most of that (a golden age Strad and the del Gesu). Here you can see Jennifer playing the Strad (with accompanist) and alone playing the del Gesu.

Among the attendees were some Russians. Beare has created a foundation which lends these instruments to young talented musicians around the world, since musicians can no longer afford to buy such an instrument themselves. Wealthy patrons (and buy the instruments and then Beare identifies musicians to which the instruments can be lent. For Strads the starting price is currently around 5M GBP (6+M US), more for a del Gesu. Upper end is approaching $20M US. The patron buys the instrument for potential appreciation and to see and hear the instrument played. The artist is required to buy the insurance (or in the case of very expensive instruments to help pay for the insurance). Contracts are for a year, renewable with mutual agreement. You can buy a lesser instrument for under $5M, but over $1M which would qualify for the program.

Larry

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bonzo75

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Yes I actually had a ticket to the Benedetti concert and at the last moment decided to go to Trifonov, because I prefer the emperor to the bruch. Also when Julia Fischer played, Hilary Hahn was playing at wigmore
 

Steve Williams

Site Founder, Site Owner, Administrator
It has been hotter than hell in southern California these past few days but that didn't stop us from catching an act that I was never able to see from their early days and that was Chicago, who performed with a 10 piece band and 4 of the original band. The venue was packed and had been sold out for weeks

I managed to score great seats for the performance landing dead center in Row B in the orchestra.

I have to admit that it was one f the best concerts that we saw this year but so also in the past few years.The first half of the show, the band seemed to be playing the "B"side of many of their hits. They lit up the stage however in the second half of their performance and they delivered.
Of course one could say that the band was never the same after Peter Cetera left to go solo, however the there original guys who payed trombone, sax and trumpet were simply superb. The crowd were swaying and singing in their seats. When they sang "Everybody Needs A Little Time Away

I also liked that the band had a drummer as well as a percussionist and the 2 together were fabulous. Several members of the band left last year and one of the original members died many years ago of a heart attack on stage

Needless to say they have a storied past

Most of the singing was done by a new member who was born in Canada,

The real treat of the evening however was when they played their one and only encore during which the trombonist's two sons came on stage and one played the drums and the other played lead guitar in the finale and they brought the house down

Simply put this was a fabulous concert and I would definitely recommend seeing them if they come to a venue near you
 
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Steve Williams

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Every year the Pacific Symphony travels out into 4 Orange County cities to give a free concert in the park

Last night's series opened in Mission Viejo which is the community advent to ours.

It was a beautiful night and I would bet there were at least 3000 attendees in a well behaved crowd who were all picnicking under the stars

I would guess that there were at least 80 members of the symphony present

ARTISTS:
Carl St.Clair, conductor
Strauss Shi, violin
Alexandria Burdick and Jose V Zamarripa, vocalists
Pacific Symphony
Alan Chapman, host

Program:
SOUSA: “El Capitan”
DE ABREU: “Tico-Tico no Fubá”
BIZET: “Les Toréadors” from Carmen Suite No. 1
BIZET/WAXMAN: “Carmen” Fantasy for Violin and Orchestra
SOUSA: “Hands Across the Sea”
WILLSON: Selections from ”The Music Man”
“Ya Got Trouble”
“Till There Was You”
“Goodnight My Someone”
“Seventy-Six Trombones”
VARIOUS: Armed Forces Salute
BARBER: Adagio for Strings
WARD: “America the Beautiful”
BERLIN: “God Bless America”


It was a wonderful experience and it was good to see so many kids all of whom were attentive and well behaved
 

Steve Williams

Site Founder, Site Owner, Administrator
To think that they have been playing for 6 decades and they never grow old Mick is like the Duracell Bunny. For a great grandfather he just keeps on ticking. One of the best concerts you’ll ever see.
 

marty

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Apr 20, 2010
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Far Hills, NJ
The summer concerts are well underway. Here are some notes from those I’ve seen thus far.

First up was Billy Joel at Madison Square Garden in July. It was his 66th show at his home venue. Joel plays MSG every month and said he will do so as long as it sells out. I think he’s wrong. When this 70-year-old rocker passes, I think they will prop up a mannequin dressed like Joel sitting at a piano and continue to play tapes to sold out crowds for years to come. That actually wouldn’t surprise me as his concerts are always a semi-religious experience for thousands of fans. Always great musicianship and NY vibe because, after all, it’s Bill Joel. However, this year, something happened that troubled me deeply. At one point, Joel turned to the audience and told them “I’d like you to say hello to my good friends Bill and Hillary Clinton”. The cameras zoomed in on them sitting in the first few rows with Chelsea and her husband in front of them, so they were on the big screen. Half the audience cheered wildly. But the other half booed loudly. Now, I know this isn’t a political forum and politics isn’t the point of my dismay. What pissed me off is that the tone of our country is so divided, and so polarized, that half the people couldn’t find the common decency to let this poor bastard enjoy a simple rock concert with his family without showing their rudeness and disrespect. For goodness sake, what happened to the adage I learned growing up when I was taught “if you can’t say anything nice, don’t say anything at all”. If you aren’t a fan of the Clintons, fine. Just shut up and be quiet as the moment passes. Are we so fanatically divided that those who dislike their politics have to hound him and his family in public? I guess the answer is yes, but honestly, it was so disturbing that I was embarrassed to be an American.


Next up was Queen in Philadelphia on August 3rd. Wowza. What a superb concert. I’m sure most of you know that Queen has been touring with Adam Lambert for the past 7 years. As Lambert readily admits, Freddy Mercury is irreplaceable, but man, can Lambert sing. I honestly don’t know how he’s going to sing at the level he did that night for much longer as his voice was simply incredible, and he milked it for all it was worth. He certainly did justice to the Queen repertoire. The original members were Brian May on guitar who was excellent, as was Roger Taylor on drums. And the production was extraordinary. The set design, the lighting, the lasers, videos and the sound were as good as I’ve ever seen and heard at a rock concert. Broadway show caliber and then some. Speaking of sound, the EQ was nearly perfect. The trusty iPhone meter showed a beautiful response although the low end was likely limited by the mic that is surely rolled off a bit.

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The bass in particular was very impressive because the driver array behind the bass player was directed right toward me. There were 4 large cabinets each containing 4 12’s and an 18” woofer aimed right at me, not to mention whatever was coming from the remaining suspended PA rig. (btw, that’s Lambert on the right). I’m talkin’ chest thumping bass but quite flat and very musical with low distortion. Bass done right. Not sure how is was for 20,000 other folks, but I had no complaints!

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That said, make no mistake, the music was loud and would not have been tolerable without ear plugs. I’ll share that I’ve bought several concert ear plugs in the past from Etymotic, JBL and others, but by far, I've found the best to be a simple 2" x 2” piece of Kleenex tissue that is made slightly damp with a bit of water (or even a bit of spit), lightly wadded and placed lightly in your ear canals. What’s great is that they can be titrated to good effect to reduce SPL by adjusting depth and density as little or as much as needed, and depending on placement, a very satisfying final EQ can be obtained.

The 3rd concert of the series was at Tanglewood last night. For me, a perfect summer night in Tanglewood is one of life’s greatest pleasures as Tanglewood is a national treasure.

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Last night’s concert was the BSO playing Beethoven’s violin concerto and Dvorak’s 7th Symphony. The violinist was the renowned Leonidas Kavakos who also received double pay because he was also the conductor. I have to be honest. I was looking forward to this concert for months and frankly was disappointed. I thought Kavakos’ playing was unusually flawed with lots of errors and his musicianship just didn’t knock me out. The only thing I can think of to put this into perspective is that hey, Tom Brady loses a game every once in a while as well. It just wasn’t Kavakos’ night. And as far as his conducting, I really think he should stick to his day job. He is hardly a good conductor. He was more of a time-keeper and it was no surprise that the musicians didn’t look at him once during either piece. As far as the BSO, there’s a reason they have long been considered one of the “Big 5” in the US. Their playing was simply flawless. Not a missed note the entire evening. Just beautiful playing, especially the Dvorak. Yet one can only wonder how they might have sounded if they were led by their usual conductor, Andris Nelsons. How fortunate the BSO concertgoers are to hear them during their regular season in Boston!

As everyone knows, Boston Symphony Hall has superb acoustics and is routinely ranked among the top halls of the world. But what many may not know, is that the Koussevitzky Shed at Tanglewood is also a superb acoustic venue. Built in 1903 and remodeled most recently in 1994, the sound is warm, full bodied and wonderful both under the shed roof in the seating area as well as on the famous lawn outside the shed where hundreds listen to the music under the stars.

Next up is Santana and the Doobie Brothers at Bethel Woods next week. And then it’s off to Telluride for Blues and Brews in September. Music does indeed make the word turn.
 

Steve Williams

Site Founder, Site Owner, Administrator
well if you are one of those guys whose music favorites is hopelessly locked in the 60's and 70's you should have been with us last night at The Coach House in San Juan Capistrano where The Platters and The Drifters (original groups not a cover act) and what is left of them played to a sold out house with over 500 people present. We got there an hour early and the venue was already packed. What was fun was that the youngest guest in the audience had to be at least 60 with most much much older.

This was probably one of the best concerts I have seen in years with both groups literally playing an anthology of all of their greatest hits. There was not one song which was overlooked.

When the Platters finished they brought the house down. Everyone was dancing in the aisles but they came back for an encore and what better way to end the show with Smoke Gets In Your Eyes

There wasn't a person in the house who didn't' have a memory to share about "their song" from the Platters or The Drifters and where they were in their lives at that time

Both groups travel together and they both used the same 4 performers in the back up band

My wife and I thoroughly loved this show and the wonderful thing was they could all still sing and hit the high notes that we remembered from 40-50 years ago


This show should not be missed if it comes to a venue near you
 

Steve Williams

Site Founder, Site Owner, Administrator
This time every year the Pacific Symphony during their summer concerts always has one concert where the symphony performs the music to a famous movie. Last year it was Jurassic Park. Last night the Symphony played to the music of Star Wars during a balmy southern California evening

The Pacific Amphitheater was filled and countless people showed up with light sabers as well as dressed in Star Wars garb

The music was dead on and never missed a beat. Hearing a full symphonic orchestra playing John Williams score was terrific and a fun night was had by all which was sold out at 8000 guests present

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marty

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Apr 20, 2010
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The Summer Concerts continue

First, let’s dispense with the Tony Bennett concert I saw last week. It was in a local theater holding about 1300 seats, but it was sold out. It began with 4 songs sung by Tony Bennett’s daughter. There’s no way to say this nicely. I’ve heard people’s pets sing better. And as far as Tony Bennett, I will say this as nicely as possible. He should stop performing immediately. Sadly, he just can’t sing anymore. It’s hard to believe that he toured with Lady Gaga 5 years ago and at that time, he was actually still singing well. Not anymore. The most surprising thing of the night was that the audience couldn’t have cared less. They loved him. It was certainly a geriatric audience and they were there to remember days gone by that meant a lot to them. But if you went looking for the Tony Bennett whose 1962 live recording at Carnegie Hall was a classic, or the 1975 Tony Bennett-Bill Evans album that resides among the pantheon of GOAT jazz albums, you won’t find that here. Somebody should tell Streisand that Bennet just embarrassed himself by singing on stage before Streisand does the same thing when she sings at Madison Square Garden this fall. Some legends just don’t know when to stop performing.

However, no sooner than I thought that, I saw the Doobie Brothers and Santana at Woodstock last night. The occasion was nothing short of momentous as it was the 50th Anniversary of Woodstock to the day. Among the impressive changes that have occurred on site, a muddy field and roughly-constructed wooden concert stage has been replaced by a state of the art, full time concert venue called Bethel Woods Center for the Arts located on a gorgeous 800 acre campus with a covered outdoor music venue that seats 15,000 people. Max Yasgur could never have seen that coming, nor could anyone else. The venue is wonderful. And for this concert, they came in droves, dressed in their tie-dye shirts with the requisite sandals, but this time, amidst a sea of canes, wheel chairs and walkers. I kid you not. If you believe most of them who told you they were there 50 years ago, I have a slightly used Brooklyn Bridge for sale at a good price. In fact, the only guy I know for sure was there was Carlos Santana, who by the say that’s when he hallucinated for the first time thanks to the drugs provided by Jerry Garcia before he went on stage there in 1969.

I really had no idea what to expect. I was very surprised and impressed with both groups. The Doobies were wonderful. This is just good music to groove to and bask of the memories of good times gone by. The band has had many members throughout the years, but some originals and stalwarts remain even though their most famous singer, Michael McDonald, left in 1996. The musicianship of the band was excellent.

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The sound, not so much. A large bass hump rattled one’s innards, but the quality of bass was inarticulate and overall disappointing. Along the same lines, the production staging and lighting was adequate and quite acceptable for the mid-nineties, but was hardly SOA. (The recent Queen concert ran rings around them in this regard). The content of the videos shown on screen however, were fantastic. There were video excerpts from the original Woodstock, and Santana playing and album covers throughout his career that were lovely to behold.

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But nothing prepared me for Carlos Santana. I’ve known from his previous work with John McLaughlin he was a good jazz guitarist. I just didn’t know how good. He is simply a phenomenal guitarist who really needs to be seen alive to appreciate his gift since jazz is an improvisational discipline. He is also virtually the last living musician who carries the moral authority of the peace and love generation for which Woodstock was ground zero. As a musical voice of that age, he is among the last, if not the best, standing. The 11 members of his band are each exceptional. But the clear standout was Santana's female drummer, Cindy Blackman was electrifying. I didn't know until I looked it up after the show that he married her 10 years ago! As a comparator, it has often been said that Zeppelin’s John Bonham brought Buddy Rich virtuoso style of playing to rock music. If so, you might even say Cindy Blackman brought Buddy Rich to Latin Jazz/Rock. Her 8(?) minute solo performed as the stage cleared brought down the house. Indeed, there was extraordinary musicianship all around the stage in this band, as you would expect. And also, as you might expect, none better demonstrated than by Santana himself. Carlos Santana really is in rarefied air when it comes to guitarists. At 71, I don't know that he's ever played better.

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One highlight for me was when the Doobies and Santana bands played together on one lengthy number; Bob Marley’s Exodus in the middle of Santana’s set. There were 19 musicians on stage, most of whom solo’d and each one better than the next. Awesome. Another highlight was Santana’s performance of John Coltrane’s “A Love Supreme” Talk about pinnacle works in the jazz repertoire! Here, he performed an alternating duo solo with his trombone player that was simply a joy to hear. Quite a performance. Certainly a show for the ages.

A 14-year-old girl in back of me was brought to her first rock concert by her grandmother sitting next to her. I can’t say she was thrilled to find me standing for most of the Santana set but it wa after all, a rock concert. Nevertheless, I felt obliged to turn and apologize to her at the end of the show. She seemed to enjoy the concert, but I couldn’t resist telling her that although she doesn’t yet know it, that concert is going to be a very high bar for her to cross for the rest of her life. Her grandmother agreed! And the coup de gras. I learned that her grandmother and I shared the same birthday, yesterday!
 
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Steve Williams

Site Founder, Site Owner, Administrator
I’ve seen both groups many times and totally agree. I’ve seen the Doobies with Michael McDonald as well as Michael McDonald solo. Santana lives in Sausalito and when I lived in the Bay Area he performed there several times a year I’ve seen him many times. IMO he’s one of the best guitarists I’ve ever seen.
 

assessor43

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Not too long ago I heard the Cleveland Orchestra play Aaron Coplands Quiet City. Just beautiful music by an extraordinary orchestra. The Roman Trilogy was also fantastic. I could argue they are the best orchestra in the US.
 

jazdoc

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Heard the Seratones last night at The Tractor Tavern. Their new LP "Power" will be on my top 10 list this year.

 

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