What are you currently listening to (Classical)?

rando

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Sep 22, 2019
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CKKeung

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Jun 18, 2011
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This is a mono CD, but the concert was played for Pope John XXIII so Michelangeli had pulled all the stops out!
Awesome performance!

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CKKeung

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Jun 18, 2011
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English folk songs is one of the important areas of compositions of Benjamin Britten.
This 3CD set is quite complete and invaluable!

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AMR / iFi audio

Industry Expert
Aug 21, 2019
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English folk songs is one of the important areas of compositions of Benjamin Britten.
This 3CD set is quite complete and invaluable!

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I have always been fascinated by Britten's unconventional, quirky treatment of the folksong traditions. Out of the four different types that Britten left us with, that I know, namely French, Scottish, Irish and English, Irish appeals to me the most.
 
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marslo

VIP/Donor
May 2, 2014
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Poland
Chopin on harp - a new album from nativedsd.com, not available on SACD , recorded natively in DSD 256fs.
Outstanding in many ways.
 

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CKKeung

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To be frank, the song arrangement on this album is not my cup of tea but since I'm a diehard fan of Mullova and the late Abbado, the cd is a must -buy.

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Thomas_GER

Member
Sep 26, 2020
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Hello WBF,

yesterday I discovered the "Requiem for my friend" by Zbigniew Preisner.
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from Wikipedia: Zbigniew Antoni Preisner (born May 20, 1955 in Bielsko-Biała) is a Polish composer. He became internationally known for his film music, especially his work for the director Krzysztof Kieślowski. Along with Wojciech Kilar, he is the most important film music composer from Poland.

Preisner studied history and philosophy in Krakow, but never had music lessons. He started out as a self-taught, writing down notes from listening to records. Preisner is best known for his work on Kieślowski's films.

In 1998 Preisner wrote the Requiem for my friend, his first large-scale work that was not intended for film. It was originally intended as a prosaic work (text: Krzysztof Piesewicz / staging: Krzysztof Kieślowski), but after Kieślowski's death it became the requiem for his friend. Paolo Sorrentino used the sequence Dies Irae in his film La Grande Bellezza.

His musical style is mainly romantic, with influences from Jean Sibelius. In the Kieślowski music he mainly uses strong dynamic contrasts, string ensembles and unusual instruments such as the organ.

Many greetings
Thomas
 

marty

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Apr 20, 2010
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A HIT and a MISS

I often get listening suggestions to stream from Stereophile. This month there were some noteworthy ones as usual, including a big hit and a big miss.

Let’s take the miss first. It was, surprisingly, their “Recording of the Month” from no less than one of the classical world’s current rocks stars, the violinist Patricia Kopatchinskaja. Pat Kop, a she is known, has been written about in a different post in the WTF and although she is relatively obscure, she is both very impressive and a phenomenal talent. So when I saw she was featured as this month’s recording of the month, I figured, how can I miss? Well, maybe it’s me, but I found this album called “What’s Next, Vivaldi” to be mostly a total train wreck. I understand that her approach and talent is unique. But when they describe her technique here as “edge-of-the-precipice’”playing, I’m afraid they didn’t do it justice. In fact, she is not only over the precipice, but so far over it that it’s just annoying. Not only does she miss hitting notes squarely left and right (which is very atypical for her), but the “modern” arrangements the reviewer applauds are often performed in other wordly tempi that make one want to scream “stop”!! If you can get through the first movement of first concerto without gritting your teeth, more power to you. But don’t say you weren’t warned.

pat.jpg

As far as the hit, it’s an extremely unusual and reflective choral composition by a fellow named Eric Whitacre called “the Sacred Veil”. It’s actually a choral song cycle between Whitacre’s music and poems written by his friend Charles Silvestri (with 3 verses by his wife) which describe their experience to the death of his wife, Julie, from cancer. A happy piece, it is not. It is a deeply solemn and sacred work. Accompanied by piano, and cello , the Los Angeles Master Chorale is magnificent as is the recording. But get out the Kleenex. You will need it. It’s not just the lyrics that are poignant and heart breaking (easy to read along in Roon). But the composition is just beautiful in a way not often seen in contemporary music. The movement “You Rise, I Fall” is breath taking in its creativity and style and is one of the high points of the album. It’s just extraordinary composing and well worth the listen. It’s one of those albums you almost can’t wait to be over because its so painful to listen to, but it’s also so beautiful you can’t stop listening. I would strongly recommend that you do not listen to this unless your environment is dead quiet. Any background noise will seriously distract from the listening experience. If you can shut out the world for an hour and listen in solitude, you will be transported to someplace very special indeed.

Whitacre.jpg
 
Last edited:

Kal Rubinson

Well-Known Member
May 5, 2010
1,926
311
525
NYC/CT
www.stereophile.com
Let’s take the miss first. It was, surprisingly, their “Recording of the Month” from no less than one of the classical world’s current rocks stars, the violinist Patricia Kopatchinskaja. Pat Kop, a she is known, has been written about in a different post in the WTF and although she is relatively obscure, she is both very impressive and a phenomenal talent. So when I saw she was featured as this month’s recording of the month, I figured, how can I miss? Well, maybe it’s me, but I found this album called “What’s Next, Vivaldi” to be mostly a total train wreck. I understand that her approach and talent is unique. But when they describe her technique here as “edge-of-the-precipice’”playing, I’m afraid they didn’t do it justice. In fact, she is not only over the precipice, but so far over it that it’s just annoying. Not only does she miss hitting notes squarely left and right (which is very atypical for her), but the “modern” arrangements the reviewer applauds are often performed in other wordly tempi that make one want to scream “stop”!! If you can get through the first movement of first concerto without gritting your teeth, more power to you. But don’t say you weren’t warned.
She is wildly variable in her fancies although very talented. I have several of her recordings but I decided not to download this one.
 

marty

Well-Known Member
Apr 20, 2010
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She is wildly variable in her fancies although very talented. I have several of her recordings but I decided not to download this one.

Kal, it was you and a few others who first brought her to my attention on WBF not that long ago. Some of her posted YouTubes are indeed fantastic. Sadly, this recording is a pass for me as well. BTW, who downloads anymore? :eek: Or did you simply mean "bookmark"?
 

CKKeung

Well-Known Member
Jun 18, 2011
2,266
1,654
565
Hong Kong
I am rather old school.
Couldn't miss this Japan limited edition sacd boxset!
:p

Mahler symphonies 2/4/7/9 & Lied von der Erde!

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the sound of Tao

Well-Known Member
Jul 18, 2014
2,385
2,251
470
A HIT and a MISS

I often get listening suggestions to stream from Stereophile. This month there were some noteworthy ones as usual, including a big hit and a big miss.

As far as the hit, it’s an extremely unusual and reflective choral composition by a fellow named Eric Whitacre called “the Sacred Veil”. It’s actually a choral song cycle between Whitacre’s music and poems written by his friend Charles Silvestri (with 3 verses by his wife) which describe their experience to the death of his wife, Julie, from cancer. A happy piece, it is not. It is a deeply solemn and sacred work. Accompanied by piano, and cello , the Los Angeles Master Chorale is magnificent as is the recording. But get out the Kleenex. You will need it. It’s not just the lyrics that are poignant and heart breaking (easy to read along in Roon). But the composition is just beautiful in a way not often seen in contemporary music. The movement “You Rise, I Fall” is breath taking in its creativity and style and is one of the high points of the album. It’s just extraordinary composing and well worth the listen. It’s one of those albums you almost can’t wait to be over because its so painful to listen to, but it’s also so beautiful you can’t stop listening. I would strongly recommend that you do not listen to this unless your environment is dead quiet. Any background noise will seriously distract from the listening experience. If you can shut out the world for an hour and listen in solitude, you will be transported to someplace very special indeed.

View attachment 70601
Thank you Marty, this Sacred Veil brought on more than a few tears. Very potent music making it is honest and deeply heart felt and filled with grief and life and pain.

Earlier this year I lost my sister to cancer and so this music just took me completely in it’s stealth. Music can lay you bare. Perhaps this is why we have music.
 
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marty

Well-Known Member
Apr 20, 2010
1,883
1,176
585
United States
Thank you Marty, this Sacred Veil brought on more than a few tears. Very potent music making it is honest and deeply heart felt and filled with grief and life and pain.

Earlier this year I lost my sister to cancer and so this music just took me completely in it’s stealth. Music can lay you bare. Perhaps this is why we have music.

Completely agree. It was powerful and moving in a very quiet way. Death has been done many ways by many composers, but perhaps because I'm a physician, I was slayed by the lyrics in a way that not even Mahler's 9th accomplished, and that was as powerful a take on death as I have ever heard. It might be that the German translation just didn't resonate quite same way, but I think it was more than that. Mahler's conversation was with God. This one was personal. Both left me motionless. You're right. It's exactly why we have music!
 
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CKKeung

Well-Known Member
Jun 18, 2011
2,266
1,654
565
Hong Kong
Nobuko Imai is one of the best current violists.
This Viola Buoquet 2 album is less well-known than the Vol 1.
:)

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