I have the speakers...now I need the rest!

Feb 8, 2011
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#21
Years ago I started a thread on AV receivers and Surround Sound Processors (Pre/Pros).
I abandoned it because there wasn't enough interest from the WBF general clientele.
But I never truly abandoned anything...in reality. :)

* The specs from the manufacturer or various other sources don't always correspond to real life performance, rarely. The Onkyo 830 and Denon 3400 can both drive normal 4 Ohm speakers (main fronts). Plus with AV receivers the sub(s) is handling below 80Hz frequencies.

Strictly stereo music listening, sans sub, with your actual speakers, both would be adequate, the Onkyo having a bit more "crunching current power" (P.C. -> 850 W versus 600 W).
And it should handle your speakers better, that's all.
But, with Audyssey MultEQ XT32 room calibration, and using a sub or two, is a good option for some of us.
I was happy to see a review with some measurements of that Denon receiver...the X3400H.

I looked for one on the Onkyo RZ830 but I didn't search hard enough; I'm sure it would provide more power @ similar or lower overall distortion level.

I think both receivers here are on target...for below $500.
 
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Gregadd

WBF Founding Member
Apr 20, 2010
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Metro DC
#22
My speakers say they are 8 ohm compatible but the speakers themselves say they are rated at 4 ohms. The Onkyo TX-RZ830 for example has the following specs:

All channels 250 W/Ch (6 ohms, 1 kHz, 10% THD,
1 channel driven)
120 W/Ch (8 ohms, 20 Hz–20 kHz,
0.08% THD, 2 channels driven, FTC)

Dynamic power 250 W (3 ohms, Front)
220 W (4 ohms, Front)
130 W (8 ohms, Front)

So according to this, it only dynamically supports 4 ohms. Is that going to be a problem? Well the speakers are 8 ohms compatible, wouldn't it be better to run them natively at 4 ohms?

Man you really need an audio education to figure all this out.

Thanks for the help,

Jonathan
If you can see if you can find a technical review for this receiver. it will tell you exactly how much power it delivers into 4ohms rms. Most solid state amp have no trouble driving four ohm loads. The better ones might even double down(POWER INCRESES AS THE RESISTANCE DECREASES).RMS is the only meaningful rating.
 
Feb 8, 2011
23,519
1,015
435
Vancouver Island, B.C. Canada
#23
In general a quality amp section inside an AV receiver, into two channels driven, with around less than 0.1% THD, and say delivering 120 watts into 8 Ohms would be able to roughly deliver 180 watts into 4 Ohms. But most are not the generality in quality amp section, more so today with AV receivers weighting 20, less than 30 pounds.
 
Oct 17, 2019
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#24
At long last, I finally have the model number / specs of the receiver my job will send me for free. Integra DTR-30.7 This seems like it would work very well for me but please scrutinize it and let me know if it's missing something that I need. As a refresher, the following are my speakers:

fluance.png

Thank you!
 

Gregadd

WBF Founding Member
Apr 20, 2010
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#25
W/Ch at 6 Ω, 1 kHz, 0.9 % THD, FTC

175 W/Ch at 6 Ω, 1 kHz, 10 % THD, 1 Channel Driven, JEITA


I prefer rms power rating. 10% distortion is a litle high.
 
Oct 17, 2019
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#26
W/Ch at 6 Ω, 1 kHz, 0.9 % THD, FTC

175 W/Ch at 6 Ω, 1 kHz, 10 % THD, 1 Channel Driven, JEITA

I prefer rms power rating. 10% distortion is a litle high.
The numbers I'm seeing are slightly different but not far off from yours. It doesn't sound like a deal breaker at least. Regarding RMS power I found this: With 8 ohm loads, both channels driven, from 20-20,000 Hz; rated 100 watts per channel minimum RMS power, with no more than 0.08% total harmonic distortion from 250 milliwatts to rated output.

Is there any advantage to run the speakers at 8 ohms vs 4 ohms? Seems like you would benefit from running it at 8 ohms and save my amplifier some work considering my speakers are 8 ohms compatible.
 
Feb 8, 2011
23,519
1,015
435
Vancouver Island, B.C. Canada
#27
The numbers I'm seeing are slightly different but not far off from yours. It doesn't sound like a deal breaker at least. Regarding RMS power I found this: With 8 ohm loads, both channels driven, from 20-20,000 Hz; rated 100 watts per channel minimum RMS power, with no more than 0.08% total harmonic distortion from 250 milliwatts to rated output.

Is there any advantage to run the speakers at 8 ohms vs 4 ohms? Seems like you would benefit from running it at 8 ohms and save my amplifier some work considering my speakers are 8 ohms compatible.
It's the perfect AV receiver ... (+ free)
https://www.avforums.com/threads/integra-dtr-30-7-review.2147284/

Run the speakers @ 8 Ohms, you'll get more dynamic power and this Integra can provide it.
Even if your speakers were a 4 Ohms load the Integra is more comfy @ the 8 Ohms selection.
Always use the 8 Ohms default setting (6 Ohms default value here in the Integra 30.7 - so just leave it there).

Another review, but of the model one step above ...
https://www.soundstageaccess.com/in...ews/695-integra-dtr-40-7-audio-video-receiver
 
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Likes: Jumbalaya88
Oct 17, 2019
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#28
It's the perfect AV receiver ...
https://www.avforums.com/threads/integra-dtr-30-7-review.2147284/

Run the speakers @ 8 Ohms, you'll get more dynamic power and this Integra can provide it.
Even if your speakers were a 4 Ohms load the Integra is more comfy @ the 8 Ohms selection.
Always use the 8 Ohms default setting.
You know, I don't get lucky often...but I'll take this as a win! And I actually feel like I'm starting to understand some of this stuff too. I plan on Bi-Amping my speakers because they support it and so does the amp - might as well take advantage of that extra performance until I bump my configuration up to 7.1.

Last question and it's about power conditioning. Do I need to buy something to put in between the wall and my setup? If so, what would you recommend?

Thanks a ton
 
Feb 8, 2011
23,519
1,015
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Vancouver Island, B.C. Canada
#29
1. Don't biamp, even if using five speakers @ the beginning.
2. Don't remove the jumpers of your speaker's dual sets of binding posts.
3. Simply single-wire them using the lower set of binding posts.
Why? You won't gain anything.

4. A surge protector is ok if you live in an area susceptible to blackouts, lightnings, hurricanes, floods, tornadoes, volcanoes, tsunamis, typhoons, ... (with a small dose of humor right here)
A power conditioner @ this level is not necessary.
A quality surge protector...$30-40 is just fine...your receiver is not like a monster amp.
The Integra 30.7 weights only 10Kg (22 lbs) and its power consumption rating is 6.4 A.
A monster amp doesn't want a surge protector bar...it would stop the current flow...best is directly to the wall outlet from a dedicated circuit breaker line...20A or 30A.
Or an expensive power conditioner/voltage regulator with a huge power supply capacity (big 4kVA toroidal transformer) ... no current limitation with this baby.
 
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Oct 17, 2019
14
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#30
1. Don't biamp, even if using five speakers @ the beginning.
2. Don't remove the jumpers of your speaker's dual sets of binding posts.
3. Simply single-wire them using the lower set of binding posts.
Why? You won't gain anything.

4. A surge protector is ok if you live in an area susceptible to blackouts, lightnings, hurricanes, floods, tornadoes, volcanoes, tsunamis, typhoons, ...
A power conditioner @ this level is not necessary.
A quality surge protector...$30-40 is just fine...your receiver is not like a monster amp.
The Integra 30.7 weights only 10 Kg (22 lbs) and it's power consumption rating is 6.4A.
A monster amp doesn't want a surge protector bar...it would stop the current flow...best is directly to the wall outlet from a dedicated circuit breaker line...20A or 30A.
Ah...Bi-Amping sounds as controversial as speaker burn-in time. Thank you for the advise on the surge protector as well as your advice overall regarding this project NorthStar.

Jonathan
 

Gregadd

WBF Founding Member
Apr 20, 2010
6,953
154
280
Metro DC
#33
I copied those numbers verbatim. Make your own decision. 10 % is audible. Nominal impedance is like an average. Have you ever seem an impedance curve, ?
If you have selectable impedance great.
 
Feb 8, 2011
23,519
1,015
435
Vancouver Island, B.C. Canada
#34
Greg, in many Onkyo/Integra receivers, on the onscreen GUI menu under Speaker Setting, you have a Speaker Impedance choice between two selections; 6ohms (default) and 4ohms.

In most cases (vast majority), including Jonathan's particular case with his speakers, the 6ohms (default) selection is the correct one. He doesn't have to change anything here if the Integra model DTR-30.7 offers it.

Different countries could vary in offering that feature.
But I had few Onkyo receivers in the past, and in Canada that Speaker Impedance selection was offered...same as indicated above...between 6 and 4ohms.

I had speakers rated @ 6 Ohms (dipping to 4 Ohms @ few spots) and I always selected the default setting...6ohms.

* Selecting the 4ohms setting would greatly diminish the overall power and dynamics.
It's best with the 6ohms default selection...for 99.9% of people. I know so, from real experience.
 

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