The [coffee snobs'] espresso thread

Steve Williams

Site Founder, Site Owner, Administrator
Steve,
Simple answer...coarser for coffee and finer for espresso. I think it depends on your grinder and the machine or the method to brew. I would start with the grind setting you use for espresso and go from there. My grinder is set for espresso only and I do not adjust it for the type of beans. Maybe not correct, but it makes for good espresso for me. Maybe others can chime in on how they setup their grind setting to achieve good crema.

Maybe to basic....


That's how I've been doing it except there is a "fine" line between coarse and fine and if too fine then it's an oily bitter taste
 

ack

VIP/Donor & WBF Founding Member
May 6, 2010
5,635
240
63
Boston, MA
To all you coffeee snobs, what's your recommendation as to the best way to brew Blue Mountain Jamaican and how coarse or fine a grind do you recommend for coffee and same question if I were to serve it as an espresso?
Hi Steve; So I've always started with dosing, and rely on the roasters to give me that information. Stumptown, for example, says 18.5g at 199F; Espresso Vivace, 20g at 203F. So I always weigh my dose exactly as prescribed, and that then leaves the grind granularity to play with. For that, I then rely on recommended extraction time, typically they say 20-30 seconds for espresso, and I am closer to 30 than 20; right now, I extract for about 35 seconds; I slowly adjust the granularity of the grind effectively by 1 angular degree on my grinder's dial - so very fine adjustments - until I get it right. This is also why we typically buy stepless grinders, for very fine adjustments. Obviously, more than extraction time, the color and level of bitterness also matters, but so far I have not pushed the bitterness threshold at 35seconds, and the coffee is dark with beautiful tiger stripes coming out.
 
Last edited:

DaveC

Industry Expert
Nov 16, 2014
2,597
493
83
To all you coffeee snobs, what's your recommendation as to the best way to brew Blue Mountain Jamaican and how coarse or fine a grind do you recommend for coffee and same question if I were to serve it as an espresso?
Let me know how it goes... I haven't run Blue Mountain in my espresso machine yet. I've rarely seen it for sale either. It's been years since I had it, a Jamaican guy who owned a cafe and had family that were coffee growers in Jamaica imported some beans, but I moved and the cafe went of business so I'm not sure where to even get any that's guaranteed legitimate.

That Traction Sumatra I mentioned earlier has really impressed me! It's very different in flavor and it's low acidity gives it a different overall feel too. If anyone tries it, It needs a very fine grind and possibly a lower dose as it's not as dense, even after tamping.
 
Last edited:
Likes: RogerD

DaveC

Industry Expert
Nov 16, 2014
2,597
493
83
Space alien from planet Zog.

Conventional latte art is so boring LOL.

I continue to struggle to get the milk steamed perfectly in order to get the light/dark shading you get from pouring while shaking the pitcher. That's my current goal, but steaming 2-3 oz of milk might be an insurmountable problem without adjusting the steam wand's output. I think it needs a tip with smaller and/or fewer holes. Mine has 2, I might try a 1-hole tip... My friend's Slayer has a 4-hole and it just blows up an 8 oz pitcher, lol... way too much steam.

I also made some improvements to steaming by adjusting the tilt of the pitcher vs the angle of the steam wand.

I think making a couple drinks a day makes this is a lifetime project to get excellent latte art skills, lol... A barista making dozens of drinks on a dialed setup could probably learn in weeks though.

 

Tango

VIP/Donor
Mar 12, 2017
3,016
1,849
113
Bangkok
Hi Steve; So I've always started with dosing, and rely on the roasters to give me that information. Stumptown, for example, says 18.5g at 199F; Espresso Vivace, 20g at 203F. So I always weigh my dose exactly as prescribed, and that then leaves the grind granularity to play with. For that, I then rely on recommended extraction time, typically they say 20-30 seconds for espresso, and I am closer to 30 than 20; right now, I extract for about 35 seconds; I slowly adjust the granularity of the grind effectively by 1 angular degree on my grinder's dial - so very fine adjustments - until I get it right. This is also why we typically buy stepless grinders, for very fine adjustments. Obviously, more than extraction time, the color and level of bitterness also matters, but so far I have not pushed the bitterness threshold at 35seconds, and the coffee is dark with beautiful tiger stripes coming out.
You are adjusting grinder like PeterA does his vta. Fascinating art :D.

Kind regards,
Tang
 

Steve Williams

Site Founder, Site Owner, Administrator
How do you guys get water to your machines. Do they have reservoirs or do they go directly into your water line
 

ack

VIP/Donor & WBF Founding Member
May 6, 2010
5,635
240
63
Boston, MA
How do you guys get water to your machines. Do they have reservoirs or do they go directly into your water line
Mine supports both, but for now, I use the water tank
 

ack

VIP/Donor & WBF Founding Member
May 6, 2010
5,635
240
63
Boston, MA
I continue to struggle to get the milk steamed perfectly in order to get the light/dark shading you get from pouring while shaking the pitcher. That's my current goal, but steaming 2-3 oz of milk might be an insurmountable problem without adjusting the steam wand's output. I think it needs a tip with smaller and/or fewer holes. Mine has 2, I might try a 1-hole tip... My friend's Slayer has a 4-hole and it just blows up an 8 oz pitcher, lol... way too much steam.
I am also struggling with frothing, too much pressure, need to start my modifications!
 

About us

  • What’s Best Forum is THE forum for high end audio, product reviews, advice and sharing experiences on the best of everything else. A place where audiophiles and audio companies discuss existing and new audio products, music servers, music streamers and computer audio, digital to audio convertors (DACS), turntables, phono stages, cartridges, reel to reel, speakers, headphones, tube amplifiers and solid state amplification. Founded in 2010 What's Best Forum invites intelligent and courteous people of all interests and backgrounds to describe and discuss the best of everything. From beginners to life-long hobbyists to industry professionals we enjoy learning about new things and meeting new people and participating in spirited debates.

Quick Navigation

User Menu

Steve Williams
Site Founder | Site Owner | Administrator
Ron Resnick
Site Co-Owner | Administrator
Julian (The Fixer)
Website Build | Marketing Managersing