Kuzma SAFIR 9

Birdwatcher

Well-Known Member
May 29, 2018
222
98
135
EU
Phoni, please post more pictures of the SAFIR on the Platine Verdier, this could be my future combination, too, as i use the PV for many years…
How do you like it? Which cartridge do you prefer?
 

jfrech

VIP/Donor
Sep 3, 2012
2,156
751
1,160
Austin
So I have concluded my demo oof the SAFIR 9. It's clearly a better arm than my 11inch 4p. However, I am not a fan of the Kondo silver cabling on the demo arm. I feel like it's missing some body and textures.

As a final experiment, I used 2 Cardas RCA-RCA adapters and put my Transparent Magnum Opus cable back in. So, this should have been just a mess of issues, adding 2 breaks in the cable, 1.2 meters of silver cabling + .75 meters of copper cabling and all the connections on a .2mv output cartridge.

I clearly preferred the Transparent Magnum Opus + all the breaks + the 1.2 meters of silver cabling. The things I felt I was missing came back.

I now have my 4p back on the table, with the internal Cardas Clear wiring to termination box/Transparent Magnum Opus to my phono stage. While I am missing the airiness, resolution, spatial presentation of the SAFIR, I do prefer this cabling quite a bit.

I am considering placing an order for a SAFIR 9, with Cardas Clear to RCA block. I just ordered a Nagra HD Phono stage, so the arm may have to wait until later this year, and since it'll be a custom build, I suspected it was going to take a while anyway.
 

thekong

Well-Known Member
May 10, 2012
254
144
948
I would like to share with you a tweak I am experimenting on the Safir. While the Safir has performed exceptionally in my system, I have always have this feeling that something is not perfect, and it can be even better.

I am no expert when it comes to setting up tonearms, but I have found my Safir had a slight tendency to drift outwards when I lowered the stylus onto a smooth surface, such as a piece of glass. This happened even without the anti-skate weight attached. I double checked the levelling of the platter and armboard, but no problem there!

When I reread Fremer’s review on the Safir, he mentioned the importance of dressing the wire loop exiting the arm block, which had significant effect on the arm’s free movement! That must be it I said to myself, remembering the Kondo silver wire used in the Safir was a lot stiffer that the standard wire in the 4Point.

I then looked at the photos in this thread and pretty much everyone have arranged the wire loop to go straight up when it exit the tube shape cable holder, and the wires took similar path to the arm block. I tried to mess around with the wire loop with litter success.

That is when I came up with the idea of hanging up the cable holder, so the wire loop could go pretty much straight up and down between the cable holder and the arm block. I believe with this arrangement the wire would generate the least resistance to the arm movement! It is early days of my experiment, but my initial impression is very positive. I believe the arm is moving more freely and the performance has improved. Not day and night difference, but very worthwhile improvement for an arm which has already performing magnificently before!

I’ll be glad to have your feedback should you choose to try this tweak :D

3BDA096D-D980-4E2F-8028-44DF7B991648.jpeg
 

Bonesy Jonesy

Well-Known Member
Jan 3, 2017
682
508
230
UK & Spain
I would like to share with you a tweak I am experimenting on the Safir. While the Safir has performed exceptionally in my system, I have always have this feeling that something is not perfect, and it can be even better.

I am no expert when it comes to setting up tonearms, but I have found my Safir had a slight tendency to drift outwards when I lowered the stylus onto a smooth surface, such as a piece of glass. This happened even without the anti-skate weight attached. I double checked the levelling of the platter and armboard, but no problem there!

When I reread Fremer’s review on the Safir, he mentioned the importance of dressing the wire loop exiting the arm block, which had significant effect on the arm’s free movement! That must be it I said to myself, remembering the Kondo silver wire used in the Safir was a lot stiffer that the standard wire in the 4Point.

I then looked at the photos in this thread and pretty much everyone have arranged the wire loop to go straight up when it exit the tube shape cable holder, and the wires took similar path to the arm block. I tried to mess around with the wire loop with litter success.

That is when I came up with the idea of hanging up the cable holder, so the wire loop could go pretty much straight up and down between the cable holder and the arm block. I believe with this arrangement the wire would generate the least resistance to the arm movement! It is early days of my experiment, but my initial impression is very positive. I believe the arm is moving more freely and the performance has improved. Not day and night difference, but very worthwhile improvement for an arm which has already performing magnificently before!

I’ll be glad to have your feedback should you choose to try this tweak :D

View attachment 120371
I would suggest you use the excellent Wally Tools WallySkater to set up your Kuzma Safir 9's anti-skate force (ideally with the tonearm wire re-connected to the tonearm as intended by Kuzma);

https://www.wallyanalog.com/wallyskater
 
  • Like
Reactions: pcosta

thekong

Well-Known Member
May 10, 2012
254
144
948
Thank you for the suggestion! I have no doubt on the effectiveness of the Wally Tools, but I think the problem I am facing is too much anti-skating force, possibly caused by the stiff wire. I need to find a way to lower it close to zero before starting to use the Wally Tool and anti-skate weight to get the right amount of anti-skate force.
 

Bonesy Jonesy

Well-Known Member
Jan 3, 2017
682
508
230
UK & Spain
Thank you for the suggestion! I have no doubt on the effectiveness of the Wally Tools, but I think the problem I am facing is too much anti-skate force, possibly caused by the stiff wire. I need to find a way to lower it close to zero before starting to use the Wally Tool and anti-skate weight to get the right amount of anti-skate force.
The WallySkater will tell you exactly if you have too much anti-skate or too little.

More importantly with your anti-skate off, the WallySkater will tell you if the tonearm wire itself is causing its own unwanted forces !

I found this to be a problem with my Kuzma 4Point 11" with its tonearm wire, even though at the time using my WallySkater I wasn't aware of this inherent tonearm problem especially with such a well respected and expensive tonearm like the 4Point 11" !

With J.R's. (from Wally Tools) excellent and indispensable guidance from sending him via email my readings and photos from the WallySkater, to take the tonearm wire mounting barrel off the tonearm body and to twist it 360 degrees first to the left and re-take readings from the WallySkater to see if there is an improvement and then to untwist and then twist it 360 degrees to the right and check again with the WallySkater.
From these two sets of readings from the WallySkater you will be able to see which is the best set-up for your tonearm wire.
You may find it doesn't need to be twisted a full 360 degrees to the right or to the left, 180 or even 90 degrees might be enough.
You should check all of these rotational set-ups with the Wally Skater until an optimum reading i.e. zero forces is found for your tonearm.

If I was you, I would suggest you reaching out to Wally Tools of your problem with your Safir 9. You may find from them / J.R. that this is a common problem with the Safir 9 as I suspect is also the case with many many other tonearms that people own and are most probably using with such unwanted forces that they are not even aware of !

I would also suggest you read this article on tonearm anti-skate from Wally Tools ;

 

Zeotrope

Well-Known Member
Feb 11, 2021
1,793
1,414
230
49
France, Canada
Thank you for the suggestion! I have no doubt on the effectiveness of the Wally Tools, but I think the problem I am facing is too much anti-skating force, possibly caused by the stiff wire. I need to find a way to lower it close to zero before starting to use the Wally Tool and anti-skate weight to get the right amount of anti-skate force.
I don’t own this arm but I have read about this before and I think you are right on.

On a related note, I never use “tools” to setup Antiskate- they do more harm than good, and they do not have the fidelity to achieve a precise adjustment. The precision is “fake”. It’s the same for SRA/VTA “microscopes”. I have a very good digital level (Mitutoyo) and VTF scale (Ortofon?) and would buy an oscilloscope if my phono stage didn’t have accurate level meters. That’s it in terms of tools — everything can be set by ear, while playing actual music (i.e., not by putting the stylus on grooveless records and things like that). Just take the time and adjust each setting a little at a time and you will get much better results than if you rely on tools like the Wallyskater.

The issue is that we assume tools introduce no error — this is not correct. Especially not with “cheap” tools with 3D printed parts. When you use such tools, you are adding error to the result. And when we talk about TT setup, a fraction of a mm can be audible.
Not to go off on a tangent, but what @thekong is mentioning is precisely something a tool would never detect.
 

thekong

Well-Known Member
May 10, 2012
254
144
948
I have to admit that I have spent most of my time with air bearing tangent tracking arms in the past, so anti-skate was not much of an issue to me. I do have pivotal arms, but none of them seems to have as much a problem with stiff wires.

Before the tweak, I could only hear very minor difference with different anti-skate settings. Now with the tweak, the difference is much more pronounced! So, at least for the time being, I will be tuning by my ears.

I have seen good reviews on the Wally Tools, but have not tried any myself so far.
 

Bonesy Jonesy

Well-Known Member
Jan 3, 2017
682
508
230
UK & Spain
I don’t own this arm but I have read about this before and I think you are right on.

On a related note, I never use “tools” to setup Antiskate- they do more harm than good, and they do not have the fidelity to achieve a precise adjustment. The precision is “fake”. It’s the same for SRA/VTA “microscopes”. I have a very good digital level (Mitutoyo) and VTF scale (Ortofon?) and would buy an oscilloscope if my phono stage didn’t have accurate level meters. That’s it in terms of tools — everything can be set by ear, while playing actual music (i.e., not by putting the stylus on grooveless records and things like that). Just take the time and adjust each setting a little at a time and you will get much better results than if you rely on tools like the Wallyskater.

The issue is that we assume tools introduce no error — this is not correct. Especially not with “cheap” tools with 3D printed parts. When you use such tools, you are adding error to the result. And when we talk about TT setup, a fraction of a mm can be audible.
Not to go off on a tangent, but what @thekong is mentioning is precisely something a tool would never detect.
That is not my experience using the Wally Tools.

Before I was even aware such tools existed for setting up my TT, Tonearm & Cartridge etc. I thought what I was hearing was great with my TT set-up.
However, after finding out about Wally Tools online and thereafter buying them and using them with the excellent advice and help service from Wally Tools / J.R., I was amazed at the significant difference (for the much better) in sound I was hearing from TT set-up. I know the difference to the sound was significantly and directly advantageous to my ears as I am a critical listener using a TOTL headphone system (Hifiman EF1000 Amp & Susvara headphones connected to a CH P1 Phono Stage) thus eliminating any vibrations, resonance etc. from speakers and the room itself causing sound distortions etc !
 
  • Like
Reactions: ghn5ue and dan31

Tangram

Well-Known Member
Nov 10, 2022
211
281
70
60
That is not my experience using the Wally Tools.

Before I was even aware such tools existed for setting up my TT, Tonearm & Cartridge etc. I thought what I was hearing was great with my TT set-up.
However, after finding out about Wally Tools online and thereafter buying them and using them with the excellent advice and help service from Wally Tools / J.R., I was amazed at the significant difference (for the much better) in sound I was hearing from TT set-up. I know the difference to the sound was significantly and directly advantageous to my ears as I am a critical listener using a TOTL headphone system (Hifiman EF1000 Amp & Susvara headphones connected to a CH P1 Phono Stage) thus eliminating any vibrations, resonance etc. from speakers and the room itself causing sound distortions etc !
Apologies for the off-topic question. What is the benefit of using, say Wally Tools vs. Analog Magik? I have to admit that the latter seems to make a lot more sense to me. To be clear, I use neither. Up until now I’ve used my turntable guru for setup, but I aspire to do it myself. I worry though that regardless of method, skill and experience that I don’t have are still required to get the best out of a ‘table setup.
 
  • Like
Reactions: mtemur

pcosta

Well-Known Member
Jul 25, 2010
368
124
1,600
Windsor, Ontario, Canada
I use the Wally Skater more as a visual tool to see bearing resistance or internal tonearm wiring causing problems with the free movement of the tonearm. Using one will clearly help you see if the there is an internal pull in either direction caused by the tonearm wiring.
I have set up a friends regular Kuzma 4point 9 and found the toneam wire wound to tight causing an excess of anti-skate with the weight removed. All it took was to take the cable and untwist it once and it had zero anti-skate with no weight.
 

Bonesy Jonesy

Well-Known Member
Jan 3, 2017
682
508
230
UK & Spain
Apologies for the off-topic question. What is the benefit of using, say Wally Tools vs. Analog Magik? I have to admit that the latter seems to make a lot more sense to me. To be clear, I use neither. Up until now I’ve used my turntable guru for setup, but I aspire to do it myself. I worry though that regardless of method, skill and experience that I don’t have are still required to get the best out of a ‘table setup.
I use both as the cartridge parameters for azimuth and zenith are currently done (until Wally Tools bring out their Azimuth and Zenith Error tools) with Analog Magik.
 

Marcus

Member Sponsor
Oct 5, 2012
560
554
1,155
Never had such problems as described above, but Franc Kuzma has just published a white paper on Bias force setting that is perfectly timed and should help to answer a lot of questions.


BIAS FORCE SETTING ON PIVOTED TONEARMS

What is bias force and how is it generated:

In pivoted tonearms with optimal tangential geometry the tracking error is below 2 deg. When the needle is in the groove of a rotating disc, friction creates tangential pulling force along the groove which also creates a side force pulling the needle and tube inwards towards the centre of the record. That means that there is higher pressure on the wall of the inner groove than on the outer groove. Theoretically we experience tracking distortion first in the right channel which is the outer wall.

Basic solutions on tonearms:

Most pivoted tonearms have a built in antiskating mechanism or bias compensation to compensate the side force pulling the tube inwards. A higher VTF ( Vertical Tracking Force) creates bigger side force-bias and therefore needs bigger compensation. In tonearm manuals you will read that bias compensation is related to the cartridge's VTF by same number expressed in grams. In most situations this is the safest way to get bias compensation reasonably correct providing that the tonearm's bearings are good and the turntable horizontally levelled.

Advanced bias set:

As well as following the manual, we can try to use various bias set up suggestions, from using a blank record –wrong, to zero bias – wrong, to using test records with various tracking grooves. Optimally you can use test track records and set up bias for minimal distortions by ear or using an oscilloscope. Of course there are various test records with different results. You can also use WallySkater and follow their instructions for optimal bias set up.
In reality you will not hear tracking distortion in music due to wrong bias set up but it is most likely caused by other reasons such as a worn cartridge, poor bearings, poor general set up, dirt and worn and damaged record, etc. Bias set up is an average value. In reality it will be too strong or too weak for some parts of the record due to a number of reasons. Record warps and record eccentricity changes VTF, thus bias, as the whole tonearm tube travels in and out or up and down in the record grooves. Too weak bias means that there might be damage to the right channel when the needle loses groove contact. Too strong bias means that the left channel groove and left side of the needle might have more wear. Be aware that mis tracking causes more damage to the record. Needles are easier to replace than the records.

How to be sure that bias set up is optimal:

Follow the tonearm's manual and be sure that your turntable is levelled horizontally in all directions. If you wish you can control bias set up by using WallySkator or test records.
But: But there is a problem. If the turntable is not levelled horizontally the tonearm tube will swing in one or another direction increasing or decreasing bias force. We do need to keep the vertical axis of the horizontal bearing truly vertical. Heavy mass tonearms with high quality bearings would be the most sensitive to levelling errors. Unipivot tonearms are less sensitive to leveling . How do we know how much precision in turntable levelling is required or more precisely how much the tonearm must be horizontally levelled to keep a correct bias set up?

Bias testing:

We have run tests in our lab and have come to some conclusions,details of which you can see elsewhere. See links below for more information. We compared our Safir 9 tonearm and cartridge with no wire loop and no bias mechanism, versus the standard Safire 9and cartridge tonearm to see how much horizontal levelling affects the bias force . We tested them in the inner groove position and measured bias force using WallySkator Pro.

Tonearm with no wires and no bias mechanism: VTF of 2 grams was horizontally levelled by the use of precise spirit levels and a reading on WallySkator Pro was less then 1 %. That means that the vertical axis of the horizontal bearing was truly vertical and no other forces were acting on tube movement. Tonearm with wire loop and bias on minimum: A VTF of 2 grams was again levelled and the reading on WallySkator Pro was around 1-2 %. This indicated that the wire loop and minimal bias had a small effect on bias force. Tonearm with wire loop and bias set per manual: VTF and bias for 2 grams was levelled and the reading on WallySkator Pro was in the range of 11 % as suggested in the WallySkator manual. This proved that when the tonearm is properly horizontally levelled, bias set up as per Safir 9 manual was optimal. WallySkator Pro showing 11 % bias-inner groove WallySkator Pro showing 8 % bias-outer groove

How much effect has horizontal levelling on bias force:

On the standard Safir 9 tonearm set up with a VTF 2 of grams, which was precisely levelled, we set up minimal bias and the reading was 1-2 % on WallySkator pro. We tilted the horizontal level in a left-right direction only. When we reached the required 10-12 % on WallySkator Pro we measured the horizontal level. It was off for 0,5 deg indicating that this error gives the same reading range as bias. Then we add bias as per manual for 2 grams and we got reading on WallySkator Pro 20-22 %.

CONCLUSION:

Horizontal precise levelling of the tonearm ( not necessary turntable) is mandatory in all directions. As we found an error of 0,5 deg in one direction can give side force to the tube equivalent of the required bias force, thus making bias compensation too strong and wrong.
We suggest the levelling error to be kept below 0.2 deg ( about 3 mm on 1000 mm length). This will give a reading below 3- 4 % on WallySkator Pro which is an acceptable error.
We got acceptable results on Safir 9 tonearm horizontal levelling using several sensitive round spirit levels, so be sure to use enough sensitive spirit levels. Before you conclude that bias is too strong, do check and adjust tonearm horizontal levelling in all directions.

Franc Kuzma

Download: KAA 2016: https://www.kuzma.si/downloads.html Link: soon: https://www.kuzma.si/downloads.html”
 

Bonesy Jonesy

Well-Known Member
Jan 3, 2017
682
508
230
UK & Spain
Never had such problems as described above, but Franc Kuzma has just published a white paper on Bias force setting that is perfectly timed and should help to answer a lot of questions.


BIAS FORCE SETTING ON PIVOTED TONEARMS

What is bias force and how is it generated:

In pivoted tonearms with optimal tangential geometry the tracking error is below 2 deg. When the needle is in the groove of a rotating disc, friction creates tangential pulling force along the groove which also creates a side force pulling the needle and tube inwards towards the centre of the record. That means that there is higher pressure on the wall of the inner groove than on the outer groove. Theoretically we experience tracking distortion first in the right channel which is the outer wall.

Basic solutions on tonearms:

Most pivoted tonearms have a built in antiskating mechanism or bias compensation to compensate the side force pulling the tube inwards. A higher VTF ( Vertical Tracking Force) creates bigger side force-bias and therefore needs bigger compensation. In tonearm manuals you will read that bias compensation is related to the cartridge's VTF by same number expressed in grams. In most situations this is the safest way to get bias compensation reasonably correct providing that the tonearm's bearings are good and the turntable horizontally levelled.

Advanced bias set:

As well as following the manual, we can try to use various bias set up suggestions, from using a blank record –wrong, to zero bias – wrong, to using test records with various tracking grooves. Optimally you can use test track records and set up bias for minimal distortions by ear or using an oscilloscope. Of course there are various test records with different results. You can also use WallySkater and follow their instructions for optimal bias set up.
In reality you will not hear tracking distortion in music due to wrong bias set up but it is most likely caused by other reasons such as a worn cartridge, poor bearings, poor general set up, dirt and worn and damaged record, etc. Bias set up is an average value. In reality it will be too strong or too weak for some parts of the record due to a number of reasons. Record warps and record eccentricity changes VTF, thus bias, as the whole tonearm tube travels in and out or up and down in the record grooves. Too weak bias means that there might be damage to the right channel when the needle loses groove contact. Too strong bias means that the left channel groove and left side of the needle might have more wear. Be aware that mis tracking causes more damage to the record. Needles are easier to replace than the records.

How to be sure that bias set up is optimal:

Follow the tonearm's manual and be sure that your turntable is levelled horizontally in all directions. If you wish you can control bias set up by using WallySkator or test records.
But: But there is a problem. If the turntable is not levelled horizontally the tonearm tube will swing in one or another direction increasing or decreasing bias force. We do need to keep the vertical axis of the horizontal bearing truly vertical. Heavy mass tonearms with high quality bearings would be the most sensitive to levelling errors. Unipivot tonearms are less sensitive to leveling . How do we know how much precision in turntable levelling is required or more precisely how much the tonearm must be horizontally levelled to keep a correct bias set up?

Bias testing:

We have run tests in our lab and have come to some conclusions,details of which you can see elsewhere. See links below for more information. We compared our Safir 9 tonearm and cartridge with no wire loop and no bias mechanism, versus the standard Safire 9and cartridge tonearm to see how much horizontal levelling affects the bias force . We tested them in the inner groove position and measured bias force using WallySkator Pro.

Tonearm with no wires and no bias mechanism: VTF of 2 grams was horizontally levelled by the use of precise spirit levels and a reading on WallySkator Pro was less then 1 %. That means that the vertical axis of the horizontal bearing was truly vertical and no other forces were acting on tube movement. Tonearm with wire loop and bias on minimum: A VTF of 2 grams was again levelled and the reading on WallySkator Pro was around 1-2 %. This indicated that the wire loop and minimal bias had a small effect on bias force. Tonearm with wire loop and bias set per manual: VTF and bias for 2 grams was levelled and the reading on WallySkator Pro was in the range of 11 % as suggested in the WallySkator manual. This proved that when the tonearm is properly horizontally levelled, bias set up as per Safir 9 manual was optimal. WallySkator Pro showing 11 % bias-inner groove WallySkator Pro showing 8 % bias-outer groove

How much effect has horizontal levelling on bias force:

On the standard Safir 9 tonearm set up with a VTF 2 of grams, which was precisely levelled, we set up minimal bias and the reading was 1-2 % on WallySkator pro. We tilted the horizontal level in a left-right direction only. When we reached the required 10-12 % on WallySkator Pro we measured the horizontal level. It was off for 0,5 deg indicating that this error gives the same reading range as bias. Then we add bias as per manual for 2 grams and we got reading on WallySkator Pro 20-22 %.

CONCLUSION:

Horizontal precise levelling of the tonearm ( not necessary turntable) is mandatory in all directions. As we found an error of 0,5 deg in one direction can give side force to the tube equivalent of the required bias force, thus making bias compensation too strong and wrong.
We suggest the levelling error to be kept below 0.2 deg ( about 3 mm on 1000 mm length). This will give a reading below 3- 4 % on WallySkator Pro which is an acceptable error.
We got acceptable results on Safir 9 tonearm horizontal levelling using several sensitive round spirit levels, so be sure to use enough sensitive spirit levels. Before you conclude that bias is too strong, do check and adjust tonearm horizontal levelling in all directions.

Franc Kuzma

Download: KAA 2016: https://www.kuzma.si/downloads.html Link: soon: https://www.kuzma.si/downloads.html”
Great to read that Franc Kuzma is also using Wally Tools A+. It's also great that J.R. from Wally Tools also has Kuzma TTs and Tonearms that he uses with the Wally Tools to make the Wally Tools videos etc. A+

Before I used my Wally Skater, I used the Wally Reference tool to set the tonearm arm / headshell to be perfectly horizontally level (in both horizontal axis i.e. front/back (for SRA/VTA) & left/right (for azimuth));


I also made sure my Kuzma XL DC TT was also perfectly level both for the platter and the tonearm tower (checked with a 'Cartridge Man Enterprises' Digital Level Gauge, model: DLG45-01).

I also double checked the cartridge VTF (checked with a 'Cartridge Man Enterprises' Digital Stylus Force Gauge, model: DFG420B) multiple times for any changes I made to the tonearm settings.
 

phoni

Member
Dec 26, 2022
50
38
20
I initially tried to optimize the setup with the Wally Tools too, but I quickly realized that I wasn't getting anywhere. So I found out that the tonearm cable should be routed in a flat curve, which must run horizontally to the back of the tonearm tube and at the same time be intercepted vertically. I think the photos illustrate what I mean:

tonearm_wire.jpg

If I lower the tonearm now onto a record with deactivated bias, the cantilever is not pressed in one direction or the other, which means that there are no transverse forces.

Now the bias setting works with significantly lower values than the Franc states in his manual. My clearaudio Goldfinger tracks at 28 mN, but the bias weight is not at its max.

bias_setting.jpg

I was able to deal in the correct bias setting by ear.

However, I'm currently still struggling with a hum induced by the tonearm which increases with the listening volume. If I shorten my phono input with a resistor, here 50 ohms, the hum disappears. Does anyone know a solution?
 

Bonesy Jonesy

Well-Known Member
Jan 3, 2017
682
508
230
UK & Spain
I initially tried to optimize the setup with the Wally Tools too, but I quickly realized that I wasn't getting anywhere. So I found out that the tonearm cable should be routed in a flat curve, which must run horizontally to the back of the tonearm tube and at the same time be intercepted vertically. I think the photos illustrate what I mean:

View attachment 120474

If I lower the tonearm now onto a record with deactivated bias, the cantilever is not pressed in one direction or the other, which means that there are no transverse forces.

Now the bias setting works with significantly lower values than the Franc states in his manual. My clearaudio Goldfinger tracks at 28 mN, but the bias weight is not at its max.

View attachment 120475

I was able to deal in the correct bias setting by ear.

However, I'm currently still struggling with a hum induced by the tonearm which increases with the listening volume. If I shorten my phono input with a resistor, here 50 ohms, the hum disappears. Does anyone know a solution?
If you think you have the tonearm wire now at a position that is not causing any unwanted skating forces, you can check this with the Wally Skater with no anti-skate to the tonearm. Then when you have near zero forces being read from the Wally Skater with no anti-skate, you can then set your tonearm's anti-skate with the Wally Skater initially to the value given by Kuzma, and then thereafter fine tuning by ear (if you think you need it) !
 

phoni

Member
Dec 26, 2022
50
38
20
If you think you have the tonearm wire now at a position that is not causing any unwanted skating forces, you can check this with the Wally Skater with no anti-skate to the tonearm. Then when you have near zero forces being read from the Wally Skater with no anti-skate, you can then set your tonearm's anti-skate with the Wally Skater initially to the value given by Kuzma, and then thereafter fine tuning by ear (if you think you need it) !
The tension on the cable can only be influenced by full 360 degree rotations in one direction or the other, which doesn't bring about any improvement in this point. So is the cable arch the Archilles verse of the Safir? I don't think so, because my solution works. There are other tonearms also struggling with this problem and Wally offers another effective solution. Why shouldn't you apply this to the Safir too? Hey, not every ship is a Titanic!

BTW - thekong's approach is exciting
 

Bonesy Jonesy

Well-Known Member
Jan 3, 2017
682
508
230
UK & Spain
The tension on the cable can only be influenced by full 360 degree rotations in one direction or the other, which doesn't bring about any improvement in this point. So is the cable arch the Archilles verse of the Safir? I don't think so, because my solution works. There are other tonearms also struggling with this problem and Wally offers another effective solution. Why shouldn't you apply this to the Safir too? Hey, not every ship is a Titanic!

BTW - thekong's approach is exciting
I believe many many tonearms have this hidden (unless checked with an Instrument i.e. a Wally Skater for instance) unwanted skating forces that many people are just not aware of (along with the other important tonearm and cartridge parameters that should be properly checked and set-up accordingly). Same goes for the Turntables.
 

PeterA

Well-Known Member
Dec 6, 2011
12,675
10,934
3,515
USA
I believe many many tonearms have this hidden (unless checked with an Instrument i.e. a Wally Skater for instance) unwanted skating forces that many people are just not aware of (along with the other important tonearm and cartridge parameters that should be properly checked and set-up accordingly). Same goes for the Turntables.

With my SME3012R I look for drift (horizontal balance ) when the tonearm is floating above the record during set up. If it migrates inward or outward one can compensate or adjust the balance by sliding the counterweight mechanism and tube aft of the bearing left or right of the axis of the main arm tube to get a horizontal balance. During set up, one can/should check for both vertical balance and horizontal balance, and then apply tracking force and anti-skate. It’s a very clever solution.
 
  • Like
Reactions: thekong

thekong

Well-Known Member
May 10, 2012
254
144
948
Yes, without the Wally’s Skater on hand, I am going to use the floating arm method (ie. set tracking force to zero) mentioned by PeterA to further check for bias force caused by the wire. With my current setup, I can easily twist the cable holder up to 90° either way to compensate if needed.
 

About us

  • What’s Best Forum is THE forum for high end audio, product reviews, advice and sharing experiences on the best of everything else. This is THE place where audiophiles and audio companies discuss vintage, contemporary and new audio products, music servers, music streamers, computer audio, digital-to-analog converters, turntables, phono stages, cartridges, reel-to-reel tape machines, speakers, headphones and tube and solid-state amplification. Founded in 2010 What’s Best Forum invites intelligent and courteous people of all interests and backgrounds to describe and discuss the best of everything. From beginners to life-long hobbyists to industry professionals, we enjoy learning about new things and meeting new people, and participating in spirited debates.

Quick Navigation

User Menu

Steve Williams
Site Founder | Site Owner | Administrator
Ron Resnick
Site Co-Owner | Administrator
Julian (The Fixer)
Website Build | Marketing Managersing