Any cyclists here?

rando

Well-Known Member
Sep 22, 2019
261
201
45
My criteria for a bike riding around on the streets aren't too complicated but not always easy to fill.
Spoken like a road cyclist. Who is aware what geometry a bike needs to work optimally under him. As well as how to make something in that range fit him. Getting the seat relative to the pedals and bar distance/height right can still produce an unrideable or unsustainable position.

I'm on the edge of both issues with manufactured bikes. When you throw a 140mm-150mm stem on any bike designed around 110mm-120mm things get interesting. Especially on 1" threaded forks using a quill stem!
 
Likes: Bobvin

rando

Well-Known Member
Sep 22, 2019
261
201
45
I disagree with the comment about aluminum bikes -- current aluminum bikes are pretty good and offer a less expensive way to get into road cycling.
Tiring up on an aluminum Trek hybrid using something like a Compass René Herse Barlow Pass will make those 70-100 km a week utter bliss. Scary things lie ahead if you decide to go the other direction in size and quality.
 
Jan 23, 2011
4,785
319
540
Amsterdam holland
This one may not totally do justice but at least it's authentic on the road "action" shot during today's ride.

Colnago C-40 B stay [size 52]
Campagnolo Record 10-speed
Campagnolo Hyperion Ultra / Schwalbe One [25mm]
Time Impact Mag Ti pedals
ITM Carbon seatpost & Mag stem
Schmolke Carbon handlebar
Selle Italia SLR Kit Carbonio saddle

The bike is about 7 kg and as far as I can tell, perfect balance between stiffness and comfort.
When i used to race these where the hot bikes .
Same goes for the look bikes they were the first ones with carbon tubing /aluminium lugs .
Is this the colnago with the inverted angle " square " tubing
 

chuck

Well-Known Member
Dec 20, 2011
141
103
383
San Diego
Fit is both the size of the bike and setting the bike up for the rider. Generally a bike should have close to a 40/60 weight distribution, with the correct drop/reach from saddle to handlebars for the rider's size and level of flexibility, also taking into account issues like leg length discrepancy or history of injuries. Bike geometry is also part of it and depends on the bike's intended use -- mass start racing (crits, road races), time trials, touring, training etc.. Also shoe size, pedaling shape, handlebar width and crank length It is preferable not to try to "make" a bike fit by too long or too short a stem, raised stem or slammed, all of which will compromise the bike's handling. The job is to figure out where on an X/Y grid the saddle and handlebars need to go relative to the pedals, fill in the ideal bike between those 3 points then find the closest off-the-rack solution or go custom.
 

MPS

Well-Known Member
Jun 20, 2016
72
41
105
Finland
When i used to race these where the hot bikes .
Same goes for the look bikes they were the first ones with carbon tubing /aluminium lugs .
Is this the colnago with the inverted angle " square " tubing
Yes, the main tubes are "funny" shape :)
It's a bit long read but interesting story about one of the most remarkable frames in the bicycling (racing) history.
Story of Colnago C-40
 
Likes: rando

Folsom

VIP/Donor
Oct 26, 2015
5,071
857
325
Eastern WA
Spoken like a road cyclist. Who is aware what geometry a bike needs to work optimally under him. As well as how to make something in that range fit him. Getting the seat relative to the pedals and bar distance/height right can still produce an unrideable or unsustainable position.

I'm on the edge of both issues with manufactured bikes. When you throw a 140mm-150mm stem on any bike designed around 110mm-120mm things get interesting. Especially on 1" threaded forks using a quill stem!
ewww don't remind me of quill stems! One thing I'm more than happy to leave behind years ago.

I usually end up with a shorter stem, long legs. Feels fine to me, even slightly low rake feels fine (track-ish). I can no-hands the shit out of fairly low rake... tricky but fun to try.
 

sujay

Member Sponsor
May 5, 2012
451
139
385
Singapore
Modern hybrid designs are deviously good at conveying the joy of riding. Original Specialized Globe was easily a runner up for best bike of the 00's. A few engineers and designers do a brand's race bikes while entire teams are devoted to hybrids. Trek's European catalog contains a shocking variety of them and they all make sense.

Personally, I'd attain a set of handbuilt wheels and extravagantly supple tires close to the maximum suggested size for that frame. Well tuned Acera won't hold you back on city streets.

Thanks! Good suggestion to work on the tires. I will get down to thay
 
Likes: rando

asindc

Well-Known Member
Sep 27, 2012
168
11
248
I worked in bike shops for years, I am a Serotta Certified fitter and have done hundreds of custom fits. Fit is first. If it doesn't fit nothing else will make up for it and it will be painful to ride. A less expensive bike that fits is preferable to any bike that does not. I disagree with the comment about aluminum bikes -- current aluminum bikes are pretty good and offer a less expensive way to get into road cycling.

I don't know your budget. But this is WBF so maybe a Giant TCR Advanced SL0. . .
About the bolded part, truer words cannot be spoken about enjoying cycling. Newbies ask me all the time about what is the best way to spend $500 or so on getting into cycling. I suggest spending $200 or a fitting and $300 on a used Craigslist bike. People simply stop riding a bike if it is uncomfortable.
 

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